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dc.contributor.authorHunt, Lesley M.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-03T23:53:10Z
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1029
dc.description.abstractWhen the New Zealand Government restructured the system of the public funding of research (1990-1992) it created Crown Research Institutes (CRIs) as companies operating in a global, market-led economy. One CRI, AgResearch, responded to this environment by corporatisation and instituted a normative system of control of workers which, through strategic plans, vision and mission statements, and performance appraisal processes, encouraged workers to adhere to company goals. This thesis, reporting on an ethnographic study of this CRI, shows how most scientific workers (technical workers and scientists alike) experienced insecurity through estrangement because the contributions they wished to make were less valued both in society and in their work organisation. They were excluded from participation in both organisational and Government policy-making, and felt they did not ‘belong’ anymore. Scientists in particular were also experiencing alienation (in the Marxist sense), as they were losing autonomy over the production of their work and its end use. Scientific workers developed tactics of compliance in order to resist these experiences and ostensibly comply with organisational goals while maintaining and protecting their self-identities, and making their work meaningful. Meanwhile, to outward appearances, the work of the CRI continued. This thesis adds to the sociology of work literature by extending the understanding of the concepts of compliance and resistance in white-collar work, particularly under normative control, by developing two models of resistance. It adds to the stories of the impact on public sector workers of the restructuring of this sector in New Zealand’s recent history, and develops implications for science policy and practice.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectcomplianceen
dc.subjectresistanceen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectworken
dc.subjectscience practiceen
dc.subjectrestructuringen
dc.subjectcorporatisationen
dc.subjectnormative controlen
dc.subjectAgResearchen
dc.subjectCrown Research Institute (CRI)en
dc.titleCompliance at work: protecting identity and science practice under corporatisationen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Societyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::220000 Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts-Generalen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370600 History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine::370602 Sociology and social studies of science and technologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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