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dc.contributor.authorUtomo, As Ari Wahyu
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-08T20:53:15Z
dc.date.available2019-10-08T20:53:15Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10997
dc.description.abstractIndonesian national park management utilises a zoning classification process, which is crucial to maintaining forest integrity, and ultimately providing the widest possible benefits to diverse human and non-human communities. Appropriate zoning management is essential in the regulation of spatial land use purposes, definition of natural resource use, and the imposition of land use limitations. As part of zoning development, current land cover information is fundamental for reliable environmental databases. These data represent the actual conditions of forest structure. Satellite imagery is a powerful resource for identifying land cover though it is not easy to provide updated information with this imagery. To fill this gap, a new approach with aerial surveys by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAVs) has been adopted in this study to monitor national park forest coupled with GIS analysis techniques (Arc Map 10.6) to provide valuable and up to date information to evaluate zoning management in Aketajawe Lolobata National Park, Indonesia. A remotely piloted UAV captured high-resolution images from 687 hectares in a relatively more efficient time allocation (4 hours 19 minutes and 10 seconds) than conventional GPS surveys. This aerial survey clearly identified indigenous people's house distributions, their home range activities in Tayawi and some coconut plantations in Tabanalau and Akejawi. Following land cover analysis using Landsat 8, it was shown that Aketajawe primarily consists of primary forest at 65,590.3 ha (84.3%), followed by secondary forest at 9748.9 ha (12.5%), open area 2045.5 ha (2.6%), and water bodies 396.1 ha (0.5%). These data combined with several spatial data in order to generate spatial planning models for Aketajawe National Park. Two spatial models (zonal and eco-social) were developed to identify areas of priority in terms of ecological and social value in zoning classification for Aketajawe. In both models, the distribution and location of core, wilderness, and rehabilitation zone were relatively similar, even though the total area is slightly different, possibly due to the digitising process. However, in the spatial planning related to indigenous protection and livelihood, there is a different distribution of the traditional and utilisation zone in eastern and southern parts of the Aketajawe region. This study provides evidence that the combination of a zonal model and an eco-social model can be used for improved national park spatial planning, as more accurate and current information better represents actual field conditions. This study also demonstrated that the application of UAV technology for periodic forest surveys to update land-use patterns has the potential to contribute valuable information for national park programmes or policy evaluation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectunmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)en
dc.subjectweighted overlayen
dc.subjectsatellite imageryen
dc.subjectGeographic Information System (GIS)en
dc.subjectecologyen
dc.subjectaerial imageryen
dc.subjectnational parksen
dc.subjectspatial planningen
dc.subjectindigenous communitiesen
dc.subjectsocio-economicen
dc.subjectzoningen
dc.subjectclassificationen
dc.subjectland useen
dc.subjectforest managementen
dc.titleApplication of unmanned aerial vehicle and satellite imagery for management zoning in Aketajawe Lolobata National Park, Indonesia : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Applied Science Environmental Management at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Science Environmental Managementen
lu.thesis.supervisorDoscher, Crile
lu.thesis.supervisorEspiner, Stephen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc1506 Tourismen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050206 Environmental Monitoringen
dc.subject.anzsrc050104 Landscape Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc150603 Tourism Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc120399 Design Practice and Management not elsewhere classifieden


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