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dc.contributor.authorMcDonagh, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBowring, Jacquelineen
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, H.en
dc.contributor.editorPasserini, G.en
dc.contributor.editorMarchettini, N.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T02:00:35Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78466-291-2en
dc.identifier.issn1743-3541en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11393
dc.description.abstractPrior to the devastating 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, parts of the CBD of Christchurch, New Zealand were undergoing revitalisation incorporating aspects of adaptive reuse and gentrification. Such areas were often characterised by a variety of bars, restaurants, and retail outlets of an “alternative” or “bohemian” style. These early 20th century buildings also exhibited relatively low rents and a somewhat chaotic and loosely planned property development approach by small scale developers. Almost all of these buildings were demolished following the earthquakes and a cordon placed around the CBD for several years. A paper presented at the ERES conference in 2013 presented preliminary results, from observation of post-earthquake public meetings and interviews with displaced CBD retailers. This paper highlighted a strongly held fear that the rebuild of the central city, then about to begin, would result in a very different style and cost structure from that which previously existed. As a result, permanent exclusion from the CBD of the types of businesses that previously characterised the successfully revitalised areas would occur. Five years further on, new CBD retail and office buildings have been constructed, but large areas of land between them remain vacant and the new buildings completed are often having difficulty attracting tenants. This paper reports on the further development of this long-term Christchurch case study and examines if the earlier predictions of the displaced retailers are coming true, in that a new CBD that largely mimics a suburban mall in style and tenancy mix, inherently loses some of its competitive advantage?en
dc.format.extent855-866en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWIT Pressen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - WIT Press - https://doi.org/10.2495/SDP180721 - https://www.witpress.com/elibrary/wit-transactions-on-ecology-and-the-environment/217/36995en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.2495/SDP180721en
dc.rights© WIT Press 2019en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.source10th International Conference on Sustainable Development and Planningen
dc.subjectrevitalizationen
dc.subjectretailen
dc.subjectCBDen
dc.subjectstyleen
dc.subjecttenancy mixen
dc.subjectchaosen
dc.subjectvarietyen
dc.subjectdifferentiationen
dc.subjectdisasteren
dc.subjectearthquakeen
dc.subjectcase studyen
dc.subjectChristchurchen
dc.subjectrebuilden
dc.titleThe consumption of chaos: From the charm of chaos to the tedium of order - The case of Christchurch, New Zealand before and after the central city post-earthquake rebuilden
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Land Management and Systemsen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
dc.identifier.doi10.2495/SDP180721en
dc.subject.anzsrc12 Built Environment and Designen
dc.subject.anzsrc1201 Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservationen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.relation.isPartOfWIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environmenten
pubs.editionSustainable Development and Planning Xen
pubs.finish-date2018-09-06en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/LAMS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/SOLA
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.witpress.com/elibrary/wit-transactions-on-ecology-and-the-environment/217/36995en
pubs.start-date2018-09-04en
pubs.volume217en
dc.identifier.eissn1743-3541en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4979-2734
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-9122-9270
dc.identifier.eisbn978-1-78466-292-9en
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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