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dc.contributor.authorKeye Constanzeen
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-10T20:02:55Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1195
dc.description.abstractAll kiwi species (Apteryx spp.) have suffered serious decline since human arrival and are nowa-days threatened on the New Zealand mainland. One of the most elusive, and as a result least known among the different kiwi species, is the great spotted kiwi (Apteryx haastii). Hence, little is known about the current status of the remaining great spotted kiwi populations or their popu-lation dynamics. Three main ‘natural’ populations are found in Northwest Nelson, the Paparoa Range and in the Arthur’s Pass Hurunui district. In 2007, the Department of Conservation started a great spotted kiwi population dynamics study in the North Branch of the Hurunui, the area where this research project was conducted. Kiwi workers of the Department of Conserva-tion (Waimakariri area office) captured and VHF radio-tagged 11 kiwi between March and July 2007 in the North Branch and started to collect radio tracking and activity data. To improve this existing data set, 10 of the 11 birds were intensely radio tracked using triangulation and homing techniques during December 2007 to April 2008 for this Master’s research project. Estimated home-range sizes for great spotted kiwi in the North Branch varied between 19.59 ha and 35.41 ha, with a calculated mean of 29.3 ha for adult birds. The kiwi population in a defined research area of 60 km² in the Hurunui North Branch was estimated to be around 290 birds. The density for the whole area monitored by the Department of Conservation in the North Branch was esti-mated to be 2.25 pairs per km² plus subadults or in other terms 4.83 birds per km². These density estimates are much higher than results of earlier studies in the Arthurs Pass/Hurunui district. Movement plots of three bonded pairs showed that partners stayed in territories they shared. Nevertheless pairs shared only in 5% of days (n=38) shelters but regularly met during night and kept in contact via calls especially prior to meetings. Nightly travel distances varied between 488-1657 m. Furthermore, the most frequent travel distances covered per hour ranged between 50-150 m. The results of this study provide information for other kiwi researchers and raise ad-ditional questions for other projects regarding great spotted kiwi biology, behaviour and dynam-ics still need to be answered (e.g. habitat requirements). Finally, the results of this study alone are poor indicators of current population health, but they do provide a scientific baseline for any subsequent population monitoring for the great spotted kiwi population status and health in the North Branch area. If future monitoring shows that the great spotted kiwi population is at risk, suitable management actions can be applied and their success can be correctly evaluated.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectGreat spotted kiwien
dc.subjectApteryx haastiien
dc.subjectHurunui Riveren
dc.subjecthome rangeen
dc.subjectmovementen
dc.subjectpopulation densityen
dc.subjectactivityen
dc.titleA study of home ranges, movement and activity patterns of Great Spotted Kiwi (Ateryx haastii) in the Hurunui Region, South Island, New Zealanden
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of International Nature Conservationen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitPest-Management and Conservationen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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