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dc.contributor.authorKaliyati, William Q.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-22T02:49:46Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1535
dc.description.abstractBrain drain and brain circulation are forms of skilled labour migration which have a significant impact on New Zealand’s economic growth. Based on their importance, it is suggested that economies rethink how they compete for skilled labour in an international labour market. This research study reviews economic and non-economic factors that influence an individual’s decisions to stay or leave New Zealand. Data is collected from a survey sample of Lincoln University final year undergraduate and postgraduate students, who represent New Zealand’s future skilled labour. The research study employs a data reduction technique called factor analysis to collate large sets of variables into small sets for econometric analysis. The key econometric tool, logit analysis, provides probabilities of graduates leaving New Zealand and marginal effects of changes in key economic and non-economic variables. These key findings, providing new knowledge, are used to engage in a policy discussion in the last chapter. The research study importantly maintains focus on three key stakeholders, the government, the business community and the individual/student when addressing and analysing New Zealand’s brain drain and brain circulation issues.en
dc.format.extent1-99en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectbrain drainen
dc.subjectbrain circulationen
dc.subjectskilled labour migrationen
dc.subjectbrain exchangeen
dc.subjectgraduate employmenten
dc.subjecteconometric modellingen
dc.subjectsurveysen
dc.subjectpolicy recommendationsen
dc.subjectLincoln Universityen
dc.titleStaying or leaving New Zealand after you graduate? – reflecting on brain drain and brain circulation issues facing graduatesen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerce and Managementen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340207 Labour economicsen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Financial and Business Systemsen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/FABS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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