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dc.contributor.authorMassam, David Graham
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-03T01:02:19Z
dc.date.available2010-09-03T01:02:19Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2494
dc.description.abstractDuring the last few years 'natural events' have occurred within many recreation areas that could well have proved more disastrous, had there been more people around at the times they happened. Management must take a new look at these areas in the light of the events that have taken place. In a recent publication of 'Landscape' (a Journal of the Dept. of Lands and Survey) G. Rennison, Chief Ranger, Abel Tasman National Park wrote an article entitled “The Importance of Climatic change in National Park Planning." In this article he outlined the possible shortcomings in management planning, and the outcome of events that have already affected many of these areas. We have a growing list of these. - The bursting of the Crater Lake on Ruapehu and the recent lava flows which damaged facilities on the skifield above the Chateau. - The mudslide at Arthurs Pass - People killed. - Rockfalls at Lake Daniels in the Lewis Bass - People killed. - The collapse of Ball Hut, Malte Brun and Murchison Hut at Mt. Cook National Park, see plate 2, and the collapse of Pioneer Hut, Westland National Park. (Both these events were. due to Glacier recession) - Slips behind Aspiring Hut in the Matukituki Valley, Aspiring National Park. - Rock avalanches Aspiring National Park. There are other events such as the Mudflows at Bullock Creek, Mt. Thomas State Forest, severe flooding of the Mataura River in Southland, Cyclone Alison which hit the Kaikoura Coast in the Mid. 70's. The Abotsford slips in Dunedin. The list increases from year to year. While many of these 'events’ may well be due to changes in climatic conditions, not all can be so easily put aside with such comments as "these controls are out of our hands.” Man has played a major role in changing much of the landscape which is only now making itself apparent. Burning, logging, overstocking, even if done out of ignorance can no longer be shrugged off. Our river's are silting up. Insufficient flows are closing river mouths, and 100 year floods seem to be occurring every other year, and we still look surprised when it happens. Surely there must be enough case-histories of events, which now tell us that we have to study our recreation areas; we have to know our resource, and be able to predict what will happen if we alter or interfere with the natural cycles. We are responsible for what happens within all these areas and to some extent outside these boundaries as well.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectflood damageen
dc.subjectflood managementen
dc.subjectclimatic changeen
dc.subjectlandscape changeen
dc.subjectenvironmental changeen
dc.subjectflood protectionen
dc.subjectsoil erosionen
dc.titleAfter the flood : the first 10 years 1975-1985en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Parks and Recreation Managementen
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, P.
lu.thesis.supervisorClarke, L.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation)en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen


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