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dc.contributor.authorOliver, E. F.
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-20T01:02:32Z
dc.date.available2010-09-20T01:02:32Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/2555
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a synthesis of four years university study in the policy, planning and Maori resource issues area. I wrote this because many Pakeha still have no real understanding of Maori environmental values and management. I also wrote this to show "the way it is" with regard to Maori participation in resource management and decision-making. I was curious to know the reason why, even though recent legislation recognises Maori interests, their voices continue to be ignored in many important resource management areas. This dissertation discusses biculturalism and introduces the concept of bicultural resource management practice. Recommendations are made regarding what should be incorporated in to this type of practice. Their purpose is to guide those participating in resource management at the Government level right down to those working in resource agencies. This map of action came about from reflection on the institutions and legislative frameworks of this country. It was found that Aotearoa New Zealand's natural resources are managed within a monocultural framework. This dissertation has two main objectives. Firstly, to examine the common ground between Maori and Pakeha environmental values and management. The split people continue to make between Maori and Pakeha knowledge of the environment must stop. Fragmentation removes people from both the environment and the solutions to resource problems. If further research is completed regarding the common ground, a more holistic approach to resource management may be found. The second objective of this dissertation is to highlight the importance of institutional change. Without a commitment to institutional change, the policies recognising Maori interests will never be successfully implemented, nor will the essence of partnership guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitaki. In my view, if monocultural decision-making continues, so too will racial tension in this country. In many respects, this dissertation is intended for a Pakeha audience, but because I discuss common ground and bicultural resource management it will also be of interest to Maori. I feel a greater sense of identity with this piece of work by using personal pronouns. In my view, it is important not to separate oneself from one's research and because I discuss such concepts as common ground, I think it is entirely appropriate. Therefore, this dissertation is not written from the third person stance. Finally, I'll mention here that whakatauaki are found throughout the dissertation. This is because they contain valuable messages for all those participating in resource management.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectresource managementen
dc.subjectnatural resourcesen
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.subjectTreaty of Waitangien
dc.subjectResource Management Act 1991en
dc.subjectMaori Environmental Attitudesen
dc.subjectbiculturalismen
dc.subjectbicultural resource managementen
dc.subjectMaori participationen
dc.titleBicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamuaen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelOtheren
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Resource Studiesen
lu.thesis.supervisorRixecker, Stefanie
lu.thesis.supervisorMatunga, Hirini
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050208 Māori Environmental Knowledgeen
dc.subject.anzsrc180203 Te Tiriti O Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi)en


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