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dc.contributor.authorHarding, Mike
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-10T00:50:52Z
dc.date.available2010-12-10T00:50:52Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3006
dc.description.abstractThe initial inspiration for this study arose from a permit application to commence a Heli-skiing operation on the Ramsay Glacier in the Central Southern Alps of New Zealand. A close involvement with the hearing process convinced me of the need for a study of Heli-skiing on a national basis. Interactions with other mountainland recreationists were obviously the source of some conflict, and certain aspects of the administration of Heli-skiing appeared to be unsatisfactory. The rapid growth of the Heli-skiing industry, and other forms of backcountry recreation, indicated an urgent need for further research into the recreational use of the mountainlands. Ideally this study should have investigated all Heli-skiing operations in New Zealand and all uses of the mountainlands by aircraft, but difficulties in obtaining information from some Heli-ski operators and a lack of resources and time precluded this. The Canterbury Land District therefore provided the basis for this study. Heli-skiing is the transporting of skiers to slopes which provide long descents of usually untracked snow. Runs are normally from 750 to 1200 vertical metres and several runs are skied in a day with the helicopter providing the sole means of transport between runs. Heli-skiing is distinct from Heli-lifts which tend to be single runs skied in the locality on commercial skifields. Heli-skiing is therefore a mechanized, high-technology form of recreation providing opportunities for exciting and exhilarating experiences in an impressive mountain setting. Throughout this study two other terms are used that require definition: 'Mountainlands' describes areas of high relief which are generally snowclad for the winter months. The 'backcountry' refers to lands that are remote from any permanent human habitation and specifically areas that require a day's foot travel from the nearest formed road.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectheli-skiingen
dc.subjectskiingen
dc.subjectrecreational conflicten
dc.subjectbackcountry recreationen
dc.subjectmountain landsen
dc.subjectSouth Islanden
dc.subjectsnow sporten
dc.subjectrecreationen
dc.titleHeli-skiing in the South Island of New Zealanden
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Parks and Recreation Managementen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc160402 Recreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen


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