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dc.contributor.authorKrause, M. A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-23T21:10:41Z
dc.date.available2011-01-23T21:10:41Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/3102
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to assess the economics of controlling gorse in hill country, comparing the use of goat and sheep grazing to chemical control. The New Zealand environment has suited the growth of gorse (an introduced species) to such an extent that this plant has become a major weed problem throughout New Zealand. Traditionally, gorse has been controlled by spray programs, but this method has met with limited success. Recent research has shown the grazing of goats and sheep to be a possible alternative for gorse control. A simulation model was constructed which includes the physical and economic aspects of a hill country grazing system. Due to the limited data available a deterministic approach was taken. Extensive sensitivity analysis and experimentation was carried out to evaluate alternative control strategies under different price and production scenarios. The model was also constructed to be useful for future analysis and agricultural extension. The study concludes with a discussion of the results given both long and short term expectations. A brief outline of the scope for further study in this topic is also given.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectgorse controlen
dc.subjectchemicalen
dc.subjectgoatsen
dc.subjectsheepen
dc.subjecteconomic analysisen
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectsensitivity analysisen
dc.subjectdeterministic modelen
dc.subjectcomplementary grazingen
dc.subjecthill countryen
dc.titleThe economics of controlling gorse in hill country comparing goat and sheep grazing combinations with the chemical methoden
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerceen
lu.thesis.supervisorDent, Barry
lu.thesis.supervisorBeck, Tony
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Management and Property Studiesen
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen
dc.subject.anzsrc070101 Agricultural Land Managementen


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