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dc.contributor.authorAyaz, S.en
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Bruce A.en
dc.contributor.authorMcNeil, D.en
dc.contributor.authorHill, George D.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-20T02:02:15Z
dc.date.issued2004-06en
dc.identifier.citationAyaz, S., McKenzie, B. A., McNeil, D. L., & Hill, G. D. (2004). Light interception and utilization of four grain legumes sown at different plant populations and depths. Journal of Agricultural Science, 142(3), 297-308.en
dc.identifier.issn0021-8596en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/372
dc.description.abstractCanopy development, radiation absorption and its utilization for yield was studied in four grain legume species Cicer arietinum, Lens culinaris, Lupinus angustifolius and Pisum sativum. The grain legumes were grown at different plant populations and sowing depths over two seasons in Canterbury, New Zealand. The green area index (GAI), intercepted radiation, radiation use efficiency (RUE) and total intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) increased significantly (P<0·001) with increased plant population. Narrow-leafed lupin produced the highest maximum biomass (878 and 972 g/m², averaged over all populations during 1998/99 and 1999/2000, respectively) and intercepted more radiation (600 and 714 MJ/m², averaged over all populations during 1998/99 and 1999/2000, respectively) than the other three legumes. In all four species, in both trials, the highest plant populations reached their peak GAI about 7–10 days earlier than legumes sown at low populations. Cumulative intercepted PAR was strongly associated with seed yield and crop harvest index (CHI). The RUE increased (from 1·10 to 1·46 and from 1·04 to 1·34 g/MJ during 1998/99 and 1999/2000, respectively) as plant population increased and was highest in the highest yielding species (e.g. 146 and 1·36 g/MJ for narrow-leafed lupin in both experiments). The larger leaf canopies produced at the higher plant populations reduced the extinction coefficient (k). The results suggest that in the subhumid temperate environment of Canterbury, grain legume species should be selected for the development of a large GAI. This should maximize PAR interception, DM production and, consequently, seed yield.en
dc.format.extent297-308en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Cambridge University Press - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/372en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2004 Cambridge University Pressen
dc.subjectgrain legumesen
dc.subjectgreen area indexen
dc.subjectintercepted radiationen
dc.subjectradiation use efficiencyen
dc.subjectphotosynthetically active radiationen
dc.subjectplant populationen
dc.subjectsowing depthen
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.titleLight interception and utilization of four grain legumes sown at different plant populations and depthsen
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300200 Crop and Pasture Production::300205 Agronomyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.unitVice Chancellor's Officeen
dc.subject.anzsrc07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciencesen
dc.relation.isPartOfThe Journal of Agricultural Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Vice Chancellor's Office
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/372en
pubs.volume142en
dc.publisher.placeCambridgeen


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