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Cite or link to this item using this URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4275

Title: The impacts of the Canterbury earthquake on the commercial office market
Author: Moricz, Zoltan
Wong, Craig
Bond, Sandy
Date: Feb-2012
Publisher: CBRE and Lincoln University.
Item Type: Monograph
Abstract: Lincoln University and CBRE, a commercial real estate service provider, have conducted research to investigate the impacts of the Canterbury earthquake on the commercial office market in Christchurch. The 22 February 2011 Canterbury earthquake had a devastating impact on Christchurch property with significant damage caused to land and buildings. As at January 2012, around 740 buildings have either been demolished or identified to be demolished in central Christchurch. On top of this, around 140 buildings have either been partially demolished or identified to be partially demolished. The broad aims of our research are to (i) examine the nature and extent of the CBD office relocation, (ii) identify the nature of the occupiers, (iii) determine occupier’s perceptions of the future: their location and space needs post the February earthquake, and the likelihood of relocating back to the CBD after the rebuild, and (iv) find out what occupiers see as the future of the CBD, and how they want this to look.
Description: Results of research conducted by using an online survey to examine the nature and extent of the Christchurch CBD office relocation.
Persistent URL (URI): http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4275
Related: Original publication is available from Lincoln University and CBRE.
Related URI: http://www.cbre.co.nz/aboutus/mediacentre/mediaarchives/Pages/022812.aspx
Rights: © CBRE & Lincoln University.
Appears in Collections:Department of Agricultural Management and Property Studies

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