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dc.contributor.authorHurst, R.en
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Alistairen
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorMoot, Derrick J.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T21:52:27Z
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.citationHurst, R. G. M., Black, A. D., Lucas, R. J. & Moot, D. J. (2000). Sowing strategies for slow-establishing pasture species on a North Otago dairy farm. Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 62, 129–135.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4566
dc.description.abstractSlow-establishing, high quality, pasture species are frequently added to standard ryegrass–white clover seed mixtures in an effort to improve pasture nutritive value. However, intense competition during establishment can suppress these species. Four alternative sowing strategies (Treatment 1: temporal separation of species (clovers sown in November 1998 before ryegrass direct-drilled at 10 kg/ha in March 1999); Treatment 2: substitution of ryegrass with slower-establishing timothy; Treatments 3 and 4: physical separation (alternate drill rows) of slower-establishing species from lower than average ryegrass seeding rates (3.5 kg/ ha or 8 kg/ha)) were used on a commercial North Otago dairy farm. Total dry matter (DM) production after 16 months was greater from pastures initially sown with ryegrass (19.1 t DM/ ha) (Treatments 3 and 4) than when ryegrass sowing was delayed or substituted with timothy (15.2 t DM/ha) (Treatments 1 and 2). The percentage of red plus white clover was similar in all pastures at 16 months of age and averaged 54%, compared with less than 1% for caucasian clover. Timothy sown without ryegrass contributed 42% of production (Treatment 2), compared with 7% when sown with ryegrass (Treatments 3 and 4). Ryegrass composition was similar (43%) regardless of sowing rate (Treatments 3 and 4) and sowing date (Treatment 1). This on-farm study demonstrated successful establishment of red and white clover in all four treatments but timothy and caucasian clover were suppressed by the inclusion of low rates of ryegrass.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe C. Alma Baker and Struthers Trusts for providing A.D. Black with financial assistance from post-graduate scholarshipsen
dc.format.extent129-135en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.sourceProceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Associationen
dc.subjectcompetitionen
dc.subjectbotanical compositionen
dc.subjectdry matter productionen
dc.subjectLolium perenneen
dc.subjectPhleum pratenseen
dc.subjectseeding ratesen
dc.subjectTrifolium ambiguumen
dc.subjectT. pratenseen
dc.subjectT. repensen
dc.subjectsowingen
dc.titleSowing strategies for slow-establishing pasture species on a North Otago dairy farmen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
pubs.finish-date2000-11-02en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 62nd New Zealand Grassland Association Conference, 31 October - 2 November 2000, Invercargill.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2000-10-31en
pubs.volume62en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1666-762X
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5691-4915
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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