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dc.contributor.authorKabwe, G.en
dc.contributor.authorBigsby, Hugh R.en
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Rossen
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-13T22:03:31Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4767
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that agroforestry has potential to improve land productivity and increase crop yields to enable subsistence farmers move out of poverty. In addition, implementing agroforestry would reduce pressure on existing forests and curb forest destruction. However, despite research and extension efforts, not many farmers have adopted agroforestry technologies. In Zambia, agroforestry research was started in the late 1980’s and later introduced on-farm in 1992 and through extension in 1997. We investigated the influence of household and institutional factors by conducting a field survey and face-to-face interviews of 388 random farmer households in four districts of eastern Zambia where agroforestry is promoted and practiced. Logistic regression was used for data analysis. The results show that trialling of agroforestry is very low within the study area. For instance, 44.9 percent of respondents had trialled improved fallows whereas only 21.4 percent of the sample had trialled biomass transfer. Despite the low trialling rates, the retention rate among farmers who had trialled was high (over 70 %).Results further show that trialling of improved fallows and biomass transfer was influenced by different factors. In the case of improved fallows, it was significantly influenced by having appropriate skills, availability of tree seed and direct contact with researchers, while biomass transfer was influenced by extension visits, radio programs and direct training of farmers by researchers. Training was found to influence trialling of both improved fallows and biomass transfer technologies. Results show that farmers who had been trained in agroforestry were more likely to trial agroforestry technologies. This study establishes trialling as the most important step to improving agroforestryen
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank NZAID for PhD scholarship for the first author and Faculty of Commerce for field research funds, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Zambia for allowing us to undertake field research and the smallholder farmers for participating in the research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.source18th Commonwealth Forestry Conferenceen
dc.subjectagroforestry adoptionen
dc.subjectsubsistence farmingen
dc.subjectsmallholder farmersen
dc.subjectZambiaen
dc.titleFactors influencing trialing of agroforestry in smallholder farming in Zambiaen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Unpublished
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Financial and Business Systemsen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Global Value Chains and Tradeen
pubs.finish-date2010-07-02en
pubs.notesThis poster was presented at the 18th Commonwealth Forestry Conference, 28 June - 2 July 2010. Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Arxiv PDF Url: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4767en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/FABS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/GVCT
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2010-06-28en
dc.publisher.placeEdinburgh, United Kingdomen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8832-2316
lu.subtypeConference Posteren


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