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dc.contributor.authorTurner, Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T22:10:26Z
dc.date.available2013-04-16T22:10:26Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5360
dc.description.abstractThis report explores the changing definition of heritage, the implications of this for heritage management and the evolving social, political, environmental and economic barriers that are hindering effective heritage management. These barriers include issues such as: • The split between natural and cultural heritage • The commercialisation of heritage items, places or areas. • The predominately narrow Western interpretations of heritage and the subsequent marginlisation of indigenous views • An increased lack of funding to an area that is growing in complexity • The increasing nature of heritage as a political tool • Issues surrounding public versus private property rights • The social construction of nature • The complexity of heritage definitions Two case studies; North Head in Manly, New South Wales and Quail Island, Christchurch New Zealand are used to illustrate the barriers that arise with 'on the ground' heritage The more generic barriers listed above were drawn from an analysis of the overall legislative frameworks operating in New Zealand and New South Wales and a comprehensive literature review. The main recommendations of the report are: • Consult, and include indigenous communities in the active management of heritage items places or areas. That Australia seek guidance from NZ to improve their approach to indigenous heritage management issues • That NZ seek advice and assistance form Australia to adapt the Natural Heritage Charter. • Establish a working party to address the issue of what the changing definition of heritage is and its implications for management. • Provided funding to educate the wider community on the importance of heritage. • Provide incentives and/or compensation for loss of development opportunities - such as levies from rates, grants etc., and improve the education role so that owners know their roles and responsibilities • Place funding for heritage issues further up the political agenda. • Entrench heritage guidelines within legislation to enable protection of heritage items, place or areas regardless of the political climate.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectheritageen
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.subjectcommercialisationen
dc.subjectprivate property rightsen
dc.subjectpublic property rightsen
dc.subjectindigenous viewsen
dc.subjectpolitical climateen
dc.titleHeritage management as a new paradigm : an evaluation of North Head, New South Wales and Quail Island, New Zealanden
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorMontgomery, Roy
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertataion can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen


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