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dc.contributor.authorFisher, Brian P.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-19T22:17:26Z
dc.date.available2013-08-19T22:17:26Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5597
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the role of Commercial touring and trekking concessions in both national and Forest Parks within New Zealand. The paper seeks: 1) To assess the growth and potential of touring and trekking concessions in Parks. 2) To assess concessionaires compatibility with park values and conservation aims. Concessions consist of rights granted by crow "To private persons or organizations to operate commercial type establishments or undertakings on public land." A touring and trekking concession for the purpose of this paper means: A private individual or Company who guides paying persons on tracks, lakes or rivers within Parks - The Concessionaire has the legal right to operate. Commercial concessions as seen under the eye of the National Parks and Reserves authority (NPRA) are only developed "To those that are necessary and appropriate for public use and enjoyment of the park area." The concessionaires operation whether it be guided walks or raft trips must be in harmony with the predominant Park values. i.e. preservation and conservation. Poorly managed concessions can be harmful to the in which they operate, and to the people they serve. It is true that a concessionaire’s business is a carefully controlled privilege, at all facilities must maintain adequate public service and operate to a standard compatible with park ideals. Section two provides an insight into a commercial trekking company operating in the central North Island. The paper examines the increasing demand by tourists to use touring and trekking companies who operate within Parks. Problems and benefits are discussed between Park management and concessionaires. Section four on River management takes an interesting look at concession management on Colorado river in North America, a number of New Zealand rivers may suffer the same plight unless controls on 'use' are devised. Finally a code of ethics is discussed to assist Parks in the management of concessions. These guidelines are broad in application.en
dc.format.extent38 pages
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectcommercial trekkingen
dc.subjecttouring concessionsen
dc.subjectNational Parks and reservesen
dc.subjectforest parksen
dc.subjectrecreationen
dc.subjectcommercial concessionsen
dc.subjectForest Act 1949en
dc.subjectNational Parks Act 1980en
dc.subjectReserves Act 1977en
dc.subjectNew Zealand Walkways Act 1975en
dc.subjectColorado management planen
dc.subjectHiking
dc.titleCommercial trekking and touring concessions in New Zealand national parks and forest parks : [dissertation, Diploma in Parks and Recreation, Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Parks and Recreationen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc150603 Tourism Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc160513 Tourism Policyen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen


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