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dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Angus
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-16T22:48:47Z
dc.date.available2014-06-16T22:48:47Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6066
dc.descriptionThe New Zealand Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme develops emerging agribusiness leaders to help shape the future of New Zealand agribusiness and rural affairs. Lincoln University has been involved with this leaders programme since 1979 when it was launched with a grant from the Kellogg Foundation, USA.en
dc.description.abstractThe traditional New Zealand meat industry payment system has historically benefited farmers for through-put of livestock with little incentive to improve carcass quality or meat yield. This existing kill payment structure reacts to short term market signals and encourages farmers to "chase" higher seasonal returns, and, as is the case in the venison industry these higher returns are traditionally generated through the spring chill period before a large majority of deer are finished to their optimum potential. This means that individual deer farmers and the deer industry as a whole are missing out on potential production as farmers seek to slaughter light animals prior to the schedule depreciation. Although current deer industry initiatives will go some way to improve on-farm performance enabling farmers to slaughter deer earlier, the majority of farmers will still be unable to reach these milestones. Recent industry initiatives such as the DIFF project and Productivity Strategy seek to improve on farm performance with measurements in economic indices such as carcass returns per hectare, cost of production per kilogram of dry matter consumed and per hectare economic performance, yet there has been little done to reward farmers for higher yielding animals at the processor or market level. With existing and emerging lucrative markets in the UK and elsewhere offering longer term contracts for quality venison, this allows for certainty of price to the farmer and requires consistent numbers to market which is achieved through optimal all year round supply systems finishing deer to heavier carcass weights. Firstlight Venison NZ Ltd (FLV) is encouraging farmer suppliers to grow their deer heavier to their "optimum genetic potential" and enable the company to move away from the reliance on selling venison to the traditional and inconsistent northern European chilled game markets. To further incentivise and reward farmers for producing young high yielding quality deer all year round the Value Sheet approach is being introduced to pay farmers on cents per kilogram of meat yield per carcass processed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Faculty of Commerce. Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKellogg Rural Leaders Programme reporten
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectdeer industryen
dc.subjectpaymenten
dc.subjectmeat industryen
dc.subjectvenisonen
dc.subjectyield based paymentsen
dc.subjectvalue sheet approachen
dc.subjectcarcass valueen
dc.titleFirstlight venison value sheet: yield based payment system enabling carcass optimization through identification of high value traitsen
dc.typeMonographen
lu.contributor.unitKellogg Rural Leadersen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme report can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc140209 Industry Economics and Industrial Organisationen
dc.subject.anzsrc150309 Logistics and Supply Chain Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc070107 Farming Systems Researchen
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen


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