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dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline M.en
dc.contributor.authorBuwalda, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorGerard, P. J.en
dc.contributor.authorBourdot, G. W.en
dc.contributor.authorWratten, Stephen D.en
dc.contributor.authorGoldson, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-10T22:48:42Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-04en
dc.date.submitted2013-12-04en
dc.identifier.citationSaunders JT, Saunders CM, Buwalda JG, Gerard PJ, Bourdôt GW, Wratten SD, Goldson SL. (2013) The economic impact of failures in plant protection to New Zealand. PeerJ PrePrints 1:e140v1 https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.140v1en
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6918
dc.description.abstractPlant weeds, pests and diseases comprise significant threats to pastoral agriculture in New Zealand. The extent of damage incurred by New Zealand’s agricultural industry from these weed and pest threats varies significantly depending on the response implemented, and the technologies available. This paper assesses the projected economic impact of three individual potential failures in plant protection, specifically the spread of clover root weevil, giant buttercup and glassy-winged sharpshooter across New Zealand, and the potential mitigation of economic loss caused by these failures through various response methods. This assessment is carried out with the use of a national-level agricultural production and value model, based on data from the Ministry for Primary Industries farm models and the Lincoln Trade and Environment Model, an international trade and environment model. The model projects economic impact on agriculture until 2030, comparing the differences in economic impact between business as usual without the advent of each threat and then with the advent of each threat alongside various potential responses. The modelled responses cover firstly the most probable responses, and secondly the use of biological control agents, in the form of a parasitoid or bio-herbicide control. The results show that biological controls offer the most effective and feasible responses to the modelled threats to pastoral agriculture compared with other responses.en
dc.format.extent22en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeerJ Preprintsen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - PeerJ Preprints - https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.140v1en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.140v1en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectpastoral agricultureen
dc.subjectplant weedsen
dc.subjectpestsen
dc.subjectdiseasesen
dc.subjectthreatsen
dc.subjecteconomic impacten
dc.subjectLincoln Trade and Environmental Modelen
dc.titleThe economic impact of failures in plant protection to New Zealanden
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
dc.identifier.doi10.7287/peerj.preprints.140v1en
dc.subject.anzsrc140205 Environment and Resource Economicsen
dc.relation.isPartOfPeerJ PrePrintsen
pubs.notese140en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.volume1en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0057-6969
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5168-8277


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