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dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Mark A.en
dc.contributor.authorWratten, Stephen D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T02:23:37Z
dc.date.available2012-11-23en
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationGillespie, M., & Wratten, S.D. (2013). Enhancing nectar provision in vineyard habitats for the endemic New Zealand butterfly, Lycaena salustius. New Zealand Journal of Ecology, 37(1), 67-74.en
dc.identifier.issn0110-6465en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7019
dc.description.abstractNectar is an important factor influencing the level and persistence of butterfly populations, but particular sources of nectar may not be optimal for all species. In a farmland context, it is not always clear whether nectar sources used by butterflies are good quality species. They may be used opportunistically in the absence of true preferences, therefore possibly limiting maximal reproduction. This study investigated the use of nectar by adults of the endemic New Zealand butterfly, the common copper Lycaena salustius, in two ways: (1) a choice experiment in the field using a replicated design of different plant species, and (2) a greenhouse no-choice bioassay examining fitness enhancement by different flower species. In the field experiment, only Lycaena salustius males were observed in large numbers, and they spent a significantly longer time on flowers of Veronica 'Youngii' and Fagopyrum esculentum than on species already available in vineyards. In the laboratory, Veronica salicifolia and Fagopyrum esculentum flowers significantly enhanced the fitness of females over Achillea millefolium and the water control. These findings together imply that superior and preferred floral resources are not yet available to adult Lycaena salustius in vineyard landscapes. The no-choice greenhouse experiment suggests that the plant group with which the butterfly may have co-evolved is more beneficial than other exotic species, and that such plants could enhance populations in vineyards. The conservation of other butterfly populations in farmland and other ecosystems may benefit from similar investigations. © New Zealand Ecological Society.en
dc.format.extent67-74en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Ecological Societyen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Ecological Society - http://newzealandecology.org/nzje/3075en
dc.rights© New Zealand Ecological Society 2013en
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjectfarmlanden
dc.subjectfecundityen
dc.subjectflower preferenceen
dc.subjectlongevityen
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.titleEnhancing nectar provision in vineyard habitats for the endemic New Zealand butterfly, Lycaena salustiusen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Ecologyen
pubs.issue1en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://newzealandecology.org/nzje/3075en
pubs.volume37en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5168-8277


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