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dc.contributor.authorCottle, David J.
dc.contributor.authorJopp, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-22T03:49:54Z
dc.date.available2016-11-22T03:49:54Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.citationCottle, D., Jopp, Robert, & Tussock Grasslands Mountain Lands Institute. (1988). Maximizing fine wool income. (Special publication (Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute) ; no. 32). Lincoln] N.Z.: Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute, Lincoln College.en
dc.identifier.issn0110-1781
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7609
dc.descriptionAdapted from papers delivered to the 1987 Hill and High Country Seminar, Lincoln College. Published with assistance from the New Zealand Wool Board.en
dc.description.abstractWool producers considering management options need to balance the benefits against costs. Options developed by scientists may realise extra returns but may also involve extra costs. Their adoption by farmers will depend on attitudes towards the risk of spending more to earn more. With high interest rates, the cost/benefit of an option needs to be clear cut. Few runholders record the amount of wool produced per class (and breed) of sheep, so often decisions about stock management are made without good objective data (Kerr and Lefever, 1983). Hill and high country farmers in the South Island receive 40-50 percent and 60-70 percent respectively of their gross income from wool (Kerr and Lefever, 1983). The most numerous sheep breeds are Merinos (44-50 percent) and Halfbreds (33-44 percent). The wool production of a flock depends mainly on its genetic worth or estimated breeding value (EBV), the feed it consumes and its health status. The income derived from this wool depends on the quantity and quality of the wool produced, its preparation and marketing. This paper outlines some basic principles in all these areas. The genetic worth of a breeding flock is determined equally by the EBV of rams and ewes used. In a flock breeding its own rams (e.g. studs) the genetic improvement in the flock is heavily influenced by ram quality, as about 80 percent of the total selection pressure (differential) is achieved from ram selection. Similarly in a commercial flock, genetic improvement is largely influenced by the choice of sire source, rather than flock ewe selection. This paper deals with ram management and breeding and selection policies, because they are critical to genetic progress. Most wool returns are obtained from ewes and/or wethers. Stock nutrition determines how much of the genetic potential for wool production is achieved. Thus pasture development, grazing management and feed planning for different classes of stock are also discussed. Flock health management and wool preparation are briefly discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College. Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSpecial publication / Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Instituteen
dc.rightsCopyright © Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute.en
dc.subjectfine woolen
dc.subjectincome maximisationen
dc.subjectwool incomeen
dc.subjecthill and high countryen
dc.subjectfarmersen
dc.subjectsheep breedsen
dc.subjectwool productionen
dc.subjectram managementen
dc.subjectgenetic improvementen
dc.subjectram qualityen
dc.subjectwool industryen
dc.subjectSouth Island high countryen
dc.titleMaximizing fine wool incomeen
dc.typeMonographen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen
dc.subject.anzsrc070106 Farm Management, Rural Management and Agribusinessen
dc.subject.anzsrc070202 Animal Growth and Developmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc070204 Animal Nutritionen
dc.subject.anzsrc070201 Animal Breedingen
dc.subject.anzsrc070203 Animal Managementen


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