Research Archive

Performance versus values in sustainability transformation of food systems

Research Archive

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Alroe, H. F. en
dc.contributor.author Sautier, M. en
dc.contributor.author Legun, K. en
dc.contributor.author Whitehead, Jay en
dc.contributor.author Noe, E. en
dc.contributor.author Moller, H. en
dc.contributor.author Manhire, J. en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-13T22:21:20Z
dc.date.issued 2017-02-23 en
dc.identifier.citation Alrøe et al. (2017). Performance versus values in sustainability transformation of food systems. Sustainability, 9(3), 332. doi:10.3390/su9030332 en
dc.identifier.issn 2071-1050 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10182/8309
dc.description.abstract Questions have been raised on what role the knowledge provided by sustainability science actually plays in the transition to sustainability and what role it may play in the future. In this paper we investigate different approaches to sustainability transformation of food systems by analyzing the rationale behind transformative acts-the ground that the direct agents of change act upon- and how the type of rationale is connected to the role of research and how the agents of change are involved. To do this we employ Max Weber’s distinction between instrumental rationality and value-rationality in social action. In particular, we compare two different approaches to the role of research in sustainability transformation: (1) Performance-based approaches that measure performance and set up sustainability indicator targets and benchmarks to motivate the agents in the food system to change; (2) Values-based approaches that aim at communicating and mediating sustainability values to enable coordinated and cooperative action to transform the food system. We identify their respective strengths and weaknesses based on a cross-case analysis of four cases, and propose that the two approaches, like Weber’s two types of rationality, are complementary-because they are based on complementary observer stances—and that an optimal in-between approach therefore cannot be found. However, there are options for reflexive learning by observing one perspective-and its possible blind spots-from the vantage point of the other, so we suggest that new strategies for sustainability transformation can be found based on reflexive rationality as a third and distinct type of rationality en
dc.format.extent 1-31 en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher MDPI en
dc.relation The original publication is available from - MDPI - https://doi.org/10.3390/su9030332 en
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.3390/su9030332 en
dc.rights © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject complementarity en
dc.subject food systems en
dc.subject perspectives en
dc.subject rationality en
dc.subject sustainability assessment en
dc.subject sustainability transformation en
dc.subject sustainability transition en
dc.subject sustainability science en
dc.title Performance versus values in sustainability transformation of food systems en
dc.type Journal Article
lu.contributor.unit Lincoln University en
lu.contributor.unit Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit en
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.3390/su9030332 en
dc.subject.anzsrc 0908 Food Sciences en
dc.subject.anzsrc 1203 Design Practice and Management en
dc.subject.anzsrc 160801 Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment en
dc.subject.anzsrc 070108 Sustainable Agricultural Development en
dc.subject.anzsrc 12 Built Environment And Design en
dc.relation.isPartOf Sustainability en
pubs.issue 3 en
pubs.organisational-group /LU
pubs.organisational-group /LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.publication-status Published en
pubs.volume 9 en
dc.rights.licence Attribution en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution

Search Research Archive


Browse

My Account

Statistics