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Cite or link to this item using this URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/88

Title: The demise of the farm labourer and the rise of the food technologist : a century of radical change in farm employment, 1900-1999
Author: Tipples, Rupert
Date: Jul-1999
Publisher: Lincoln University. Farm and Horticultural Management Group.
Series/Report no.: Research report (Lincoln University (Canterbury, N.Z.). Farm and Horticultural Management Group) ; 99/05
Item Type: Monograph
Abstract: This paper reviews changes in farm employment over the 20th Century by viewing farm work as it was around 1900 and how it is appearing to be by 1999 through the eyes of contemporary observers. Then changes in work and employment are considered under the following headings: The Role of Government, the Labour Force, Production, Mechanisation, Pest Control, Transport, Communications, Marketing, Education, and Employment Relations. The paper concludes that while much farm work has increasing technological demands, at the same time much also retains its laborious nature.
Description: Amended version of a paper to the January 1999 Combined Conferences of the Australian and New Zealand Agricultural Resource Economics Societies, Christchurch Convention Centre.
Persistent URL (URI): http://hdl.handle.net/10182/88
ISSN: 1174-8796
Appears in Collections:Farm and Horticultural Management Group Research Report series

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