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dc.contributor.authorKerr, Geoffrey N.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T02:57:00Z
dc.date.available2017-11en
dc.date.issued2017-11en
dc.identifier.isbn9780864764119en
dc.identifier.issn1172-0859en
dc.identifier.other45en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/8818
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the hypotheses that marginal utility from killing game animals in New Zealand big game hunts diminishes with number of kills, and that hunt motivations affect marginal satisfaction. In addition to comparison of mean satisfaction scores for hunters experiencing different measures of success, and measures of association based on correlations and analysis of variance, a random parameters ordered-logit model utilises panel data from a large number of hunters to model effects of success on satisfaction. Motivations are important determinants of satisfaction, with harvest-oriented hunters generally less satisfied than were other hunters, unless the harvest-oriented hunters made a kill. Sighting game significantly enhanced satisfaction, which increased more if the hunters killed a game animal. Making a kill had a smaller effect on satisfaction for high-avidity hunters. Results confirm diminishing marginal utility of kills, suggesting potential gains from management responses that spread the game harvest over a larger number of hunters.en
dc.format.extent1-29en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. LEaPen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. LEaP - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/580en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLEaP Research Reporten
dc.rights©LEaP, Lincoln University, New Zealand 2017en
dc.subjectsatisfactionen
dc.subjectbig game managementen
dc.subjecthuntingen
dc.subjectharvesten
dc.subjectheterogeneityen
dc.subjectordered-logiten
dc.titleBig game hunting satisfaction: A test of diminishing marginal satisfaction of harvesten
dc.typeReport
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
dc.subject.anzsrc160402 Recreation, Leisure and Tourism Geographyen
dc.subject.anzsrc1608 Sociologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc150404 Sport and Leisure Managementen
pubs.confidentialfalseen
pubs.issue45en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DEM
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/580en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterbury, New Zealanden
dc.identifier.eissn1172-0891en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5806-1944
dc.identifier.eisbn978-0-86476-412-6en
lu.subtypeTechnical Reporten


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