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dc.contributor.authorDalziel, Paul C.en
dc.contributor.authorHulme, Philip E.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-19T01:19:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-07en
dc.identifier.citationDalziel, P., & Hulme, P.E. (2016). A socio-economic research plan for evaluating possible interventions in New Zealand's biosecurity networks. Research Report No. 338, prepared for the Biological Heritage, Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho National Science Challenge. Lincoln University: Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-877519-42-0en
dc.identifier.issn1170-7682en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/8856
dc.description.abstractThis report was prepared for the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. New Zealand has a range of institutional arrangements for responding to a biosecurity incursion, including interventions at points in human-assisted networks such as displaying public notices, distributing information pamphlets, requiring some inspection of vehicles or passengers, or banning the transport of certain animals or commodities. Any intervention along these lines would impose costs as well as benefits. Policy advisors therefore require a robust procedure for ensuring that a possible intervention is found to be justified from a public policy perspective. The purpose of this report is to contribute to better understanding of targeted control efforts by answering the following research question: How can we evaluate the socio-economic costs and benefits, and the distribution of those costs and benefits, resulting from any proposed network intervention in response to a biosecurity incursion?en
dc.format.extent1-31 (38)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Unversity. AERUen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln Unversity. AERU - https://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/handle/10182/121en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAERU Research Report No. 338en
dc.rights© Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit. Lincoln University, New Zealand, 2016.en
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.subjectbiosecurityen
dc.subjectcost benefit analysisen
dc.subjecthuman-assisted networksen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleA socio-economic research plan for evaluating possible interventions in New Zealand's biosecurity networksen
dc.typeMonograph
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
dc.subject.anzsrc050103 Invasive Species Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc050206 Environmental Monitoringen
dc.subject.anzsrc070603 Horticultural Crop Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)en
dc.subject.anzsrc160505 Economic Development Policyen
pubs.notesCC BYen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/handle/10182/121en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterbury, New Zealanden
dc.identifier.eissn2230-3197en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1757-6888
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5712-0474


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