Research Archive

Browsing by Subject "hill country"

Research Archive

Browsing by Subject "hill country"

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  • Beck, A. C.; Dent, J. B. (Lincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit., 1984)
    The objective of this study was to analyse some key aspects of the North Island hill country farming system in order to provide a better basis for understanding the impact of political, economic and environmental factors ...
  • Gillespie, B. J.; Lucas, Richard J.; Moot, Derrick J.; Edwards, Grant (Lincoln University, Agriculture Group., Dunedin, 2006-11)
    Salt application is a tool for pasture management and improvement in the hill/high country that could be used together with other methods such as herbicides, seeding, sub-division, grazing management and fertiliser.
  • Gillespie, Benjamin J.; Lucas, Richard J.; Moot, Derrick J.; Edwards, Grant (New Zealand Grassland Association, 2006)
    Two experiments were conducted in sodium deficient (<0.03% Na in DM) pastures on steep, south facing slopes at Mt Grand, Hawea, Central Otago (600 m.a.s.l), to determine the effect of the application of coarse salt (NaCl) ...
  • Radcliffe, Joan E. (Lincoln College, University of Canterbury, 1979)
    In view of the scarcity of published information on pasture production and climate relationships in New Zealand and especially such relationships in hill country these factors were studied at 23 lowland sites throughout ...
  • Wright, Lester (Lincoln University. Faculty of Commerce. Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme., 2005)
    Increased nitrogen application has potential to achieve "step change" in forage production and productivity of hill country properties. This paper reports the results of a financial evaluation of high rates of nitrogen ...
  • Andersen, Colin J. (Lincoln College, University of Canterbury, 1988)
    Non-arable New Zealand hill country pasture is characterised by a high proportion of low fertility grasses and weeds. This places limitations on their productive capacity. Aerial oversowing and topdressing has improved the ...
  • Krause, M. A.; Beck, A. C.; Dent, J. B. (Lincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit., 1984-03)
    The aim of this study was to assess the economics of controlling gorse in hill country by comparing the use of goat and sheep grazing with chemical control. The New Zealand environment has suited the growth of gorse (an ...
  • Krause, M. A. (Lincoln College, University of Canterbury, 1983)
    The aim of this study was to assess the economics of controlling gorse in hill country, comparing the use of goat and sheep grazing to chemical control. The New Zealand environment has suited the growth of gorse (an ...
  • Holden, J. S. (Lincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit., 1966)
    The problem is, is hill country development a good avenue for investment; if so, how, in general, should it be done? To help answer the question, a method of ranking alternative investments is required. With this, ...
  • Hay, R. J. M. (Lincoln College, University of Canterbury, 1973)
    The excellent results obtained in the establishment of legumes in much of the tussock hill country of the South Island, New Zealand, are somewhat balanced by quite disappointing establishment from grass oversowing in the ...
  • Groenendijk, Francis M. (Lincoln University, 1997)
    The objective of this research project was to determine the effects of radiata pine on the nature, distribution and availability of organic matter and nutrients in hill country soils developed under improved pasture at ...
  • Stead, W. T. (Lincoln College, University of Canterbury, 1981)
    A report is presented on two methods of Energy Analysis applied to the operation of a North Island hard hill country, store sheep and cattle unit, situated in Taranaki. Energy Intensities, in the form of Energy Dollar ...
  • Walter, David (Lincoln University. Faculty of Commerce. Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme., 1979)
    To many outsiders, the popular farming image of Taranaki is that of dairying, and indeed this would be so if the Taranaki land area was restricted to the ring plain surrounding Mt Egmont. However much of inland Taranaki ...
  • Sandrey, R. A. (Lincoln College. Agricultural and Economics Research Unit., 1987-01)
    Recent proposals have been made to introduce biological agents to naturally regulate gorse (Ulex europaeus) in New Zealand (Hillcost-benefit analysis, 1986). Gorse is a serious scrub weed to both farmers and foresters, but ...
  • Johnson, R. W. M. (Lincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit., 1967-07)
    This publication reports on a further investigation of hill country development undertaken by the Agricultural Economics Research Unit. Molesworth Station is a large property in the tussock grassland area of the South ...
  • Johnson, R. W. M. (Lincoln College. Agricultural Economics Research Unit., 1967)
    The Agricultural Economics Research Unit has, over the last three years, published a number of studies relating to hill country development in New Zealand. A further stage in this continuing investigation of development ...
  • Maxwell, Thomas M. R.; Moir, James L.; Edwards, Grant (New Zealand Grassland Association., 2010)
    The abundance of four naturalised annual clovers (striated, cluster, suckling, haresfoot) and two sown clovers (subterranean and white clover) was investigated in relation to topographical, soil fertility and management ...
  • White, J. G. H.; Meijer, G. (New Zealand Grassland Association., 1978)
    Field experiments have been conducted for 6 years at Hunua in North Canterbury to compare a range of grass and legume cultivars for sunny aspects of dry hill country. The most suitable legumes were Woogenellup subterranean ...
  • Moot, Derrick J.; Lucas, Richard J. (Lincoln University., Canterbury, 2012-04-03)
    The booklet presents the preliminary results of a TIFF funded “MAXClover’ dryland hill country legume experiment at Clarence Bridge, Marlborough. It also includes a practical guide to on-farm management for direct grazed ...
  • Moot, Derrick J. (Wairoa, Hawkes Bay, 2012)
    In drought prone hill country, legumes can be introduced to increase nitrogen transfer to companion grasses which increases both the quality and quantity of feed available for grazing livestock. This powerpoint presentation ...

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