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dc.contributor.authorMeurk, C. D.
dc.contributor.authorMcWilliam, Wendy J.
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Jon J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T23:00:56Z
dc.date.created2012-11-27en
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10042
dc.description.abstractThe foundations of landscape ecology are well established and comprise vertical structure within a location; horizontal or spatial structure in terms of patch/node, corridor and matrix configuration; functional dynamics involving animal movement, propagules, material cycles and energy flows; and social interactions with the natural world. In continental regions, with long- established accommodation between autotrophs, herbivores and predator guilds, there are generally easily applied rules around the relationship between habitat area and species diversity, and between wildlife strategies and the edge to core ratio of habitat. In New Zealand these relationships are blurred because of the overwhelming impact of introduced competitors and predators on long-isolated, naïve biota. New Zealand continues to experience significant species loss, particularly within intensively developed agricultural landscapes with limited and fragmented supporting habitat or biological sources. At the same time, there is an increasing interest in habitat restoration among public institutions, communities, iwi, private landowners, landscape architects and students who seek guidance in their restoration efforts. This demand is outstripping the careful, empirical testing of best practice, especially when it comes to spatial considerations; yet we can’t really afford to wait for the definitive science given the urgency of the task. Here we accordingly describe a broad structural framework for restoring native biodiversity at the landscape level in New Zealand based upon collected publications and local ecological opinion to inform practitioners about basic principles of biodiversity restoration. These best practice rules will be refined and adapted as theory and practice converge.en
dc.format.extent77-77 (1)en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Ecological Society
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Ecological Society - http://newzealandecology.org/events/conference-2012en
dc.sourceNew Zealand Ecological Society Conference 2012en
dc.subjectlandscape theoryen
dc.titleLandscape theory to applied landscape design in a New Zealand contexten
dc.typeConference Contribution - published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservation
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architecture
pubs.finish-date2012-11-29en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/SOLA
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://newzealandecology.org/events/conference-2012en
pubs.start-date2012-11-25en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6169-6660
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4889-9716
lu.subtypeConference Abstracten


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