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dc.contributor.authorLambert, Simon J.
dc.contributor.authorWaipara, N.
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorShadbolt, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorWood, W.
dc.contributor.editorUrquhart, J.en
dc.contributor.editorMarzano, M.en
dc.contributor.editorPotter, C.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-16T23:45:35Z
dc.date.available2018-05-25en
dc.date.issued2018-05-25
dc.identifier.citationLambert, S., Waipara, N., Black, A., Mark-Shadbolt, M., & Wood, W. (2018). Indigenous biosecurity: Māori responses to kauri dieback and myrtle rust in Aotearoa New Zealand. In J. Urquhart, M. Marzano & C. Potter (Eds.), The human dimensions of forest and tree health. Palgrave-Macmillian. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-76956-1
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-76955-4en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10068
dc.description.abstractIt is widely acknowledged that Indigenous peoples have traditional knowledge relevant to modern environmental management. By asserting roles within associated science and policy networks, such Indigenous Knowledge (IK) can be seen as part of the resistance to colonisation that includes protest, treaty making, political and economic empowerment, legislation, cultural renaissance and regulatory influence. In New Zealand, these achievements inform attempts by Māori (the Indigenous people of New Zealand) to manage forest ecosystems and cultural keystone species. This chapter presents two case studies of how indigenous participation in modern biosecurity through the example of Māori asserting and contributing to forest management. While progress is often frustratingly slow for indigenous participants, significant gains in acceptance of Māori cultural frameworks have been achieved.en
dc.format.extentpp. 109-137, chapter 5 of 19en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPalgrave-Macmillian
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Palgrave-Macmillian - https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76956-1en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76956-1en
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.subjectMāorien
dc.subjectkaurien
dc.subjectdiebacken
dc.subjectmyrtle rusten
dc.titleIndigenous biosecurity: Māori responses to kauri dieback and myrtle rust in Aotearoa New Zealanden
dc.typeBook Chapter
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centre
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-76956-1en
dc.subject.anzsrc050208 Māori Environmental Knowledgeen
dc.subject.anzsrc0607 Plant Biologyen
dc.relation.isPartOfThe human dimensions of forest and tree healthen
pubs.notesChapter 5 and 11 are open access under a CC BY 4.0 license via link.springer.com -https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-76956-1#abouten
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen
dc.publisher.placeCham, Switzerlanden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7302-0895
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7744-6372
dc.identifier.eisbn978-3-319-76956-1en


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