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dc.contributor.authorLove, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorVallance, Suzanne A.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-14T22:45:09Z
dc.date.available2014-03-27en
dc.date.issued2013-12en
dc.identifier.citationLove, R., & Vallace, S. (2013). The role of communities in post-disaster recovery planning: A Diamond Harbour case study. Lincoln Planning Review, 5(1-2), 3-9.en
dc.identifier.issn1175-0987en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10138
dc.description.abstractThough there is strong agreement in the literature that community participation in disaster recovery is crucial, there is a lack of consensus over what might constitute a model of disaster recovery ‘best practice’ of community engagement. This paper contributes to an enhanced understanding of community engagement in disaster recovery by, first, drawing on 'peacetime' participation literature and secondly, illustrating a case study of post-disaster community-led planning in Diamond Harbour. We argue that roles for community groups vary, but that some communities would rather have influence than decision-making ability, and that this influence can take a number of forms. Though peacetime participation typologies are useful, we suggest that there may be value in combining development studies with scholarship around disaster recovery to account for the suspension of formal modes of participation that often accompanies disasters.en
dc.format.extent3-9en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University Planning Associationen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University Planning Association - http://journals.lincoln.ac.nz/index.php/LPR/issue/view/73en
dc.rights@The Authors.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/en
dc.subjectpost-disaster recovery planningen
dc.subjectcommunity engagementen
dc.subjectdisaster recoveryen
dc.subjectcommunity-led planningen
dc.subjectDiamond Harbouren
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.titleThe role of communities in post-disaster recovery planning: A Diamond Harbour case studyen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc120501 Community Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.relation.isPartOfLincoln Planning Reviewen
pubs.issue1/2en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DEM
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://journals.lincoln.ac.nz/index.php/LPR/issue/view/73en
pubs.volume5en
dc.rights.licenceAttribution-ShareAlikeen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8964-0340


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