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dc.contributor.authorGough, Janet D.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-29T02:15:44Z
dc.date.available2009-04-29T02:15:44Z
dc.date.issued1990-05
dc.identifier.isbn1-86931-006-3
dc.identifier.issn0112-0875
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1023
dc.description.abstractThe concept of an acceptable risk is an integral part of modern society. However, when we attempt to determine what an acceptable risk is in a particular situation, we have to consider questions such as 'to whom is the risk acceptable?' and 'where are the likely costs (risks) and benefits likely to fall?'. People's perceptions of risk are an important factor when determining a level of risk (or safety) for a particular activity such as the location of a chemical plant, the building of a bridge, effluent disposal in waterways, hydro fluorocarbon use and the many other hazardous activities that are integral parts of our current way of life. Risks are not new to society. Many risk levels have been reduced considerably as a result of increased technical and scientific knowledge. However, people's perceptions of risk and their tolerance of risk have changed significantly in the past 20-30 years as greater publicity has been given to aspects of risk and failures of technical systems. The expert's credibility has been threatened by incidents and disasters such as Three Mile Island, Flixborough, Windscale and Bhopal. As a result, it has become imperative that experts and decision makers take account of people's perceptions of risk and their ability to tolerate or accept risk. The literature on perceived risk and acceptable risk through a period of very rapid change is examined in this publication Continuing development in this area means that we must continue to monitor techniques for estimating perceived risk and also explore the links with acceptable risken
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University & University of Canterbury. Centre for Resource Managementen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInformation paper (Centre for Resource Management) ; no.14en
dc.rightsCopyright © Centre for Resource Management.en
dc.subjectrisk assessmenten
dc.subjectdecision makingen
dc.subjectrisk managementen
dc.subjectacceptable risken
dc.subjectperceived risken
dc.subjectrisk perceptionen
dc.titleA review of the literature pertaining to 'perceived' risk and 'acceptable' risk and the methods used to estimate themen
dc.typeMonographen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300800 Environmental Science::300804 Environmental impact assessmenten
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300800 Environmental Science::300801 Environmental management and rehabilitationen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370106 Sociological methodology and research methodsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370105 Applied sociology, programme evaluation and social impact assessmenten
lu.contributor.unitCentre for Resource Managementen


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