Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKennedy Euan, S.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-04T00:04:48Z
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1031
dc.description.abstractSince 1984, public service occupations in New Zealand have been subordinated to the over-determined bureaucratic structures of contemporary managerialism. The reactions of front-line public servants to New Management’s unfamiliar ‘market-place’ imperatives and the concomitant loss of occupational autonomy have received very little rigorous qualitative analysis. This study addresses that shortfall, taking as its cue a key question in the sociology of ‘profession’—what arouses or subdues the inclination of bureaucratised occupations to professionalise as a means of reclaiming autonomy? It explains the nature and meaning of strategies adopted by front-line practitioners in New Zealand’s Department of Conservation (DOC) to defend their marginalised work conventions and collegial culture. Symbolic interactionist analysis shows that profoundly personal values and beliefs connect vocationally motivated practitioners with their ‘mission’ (to conserve natural and cultural heritage). These powerful intuitive connections play a crucial role in subduing interest in resistance and organised strategic action, principally by converting conservation labour into the pursuit of personal fulfilment. Practitioners respond to managerial intrusions on their core work (the source of their fulfilment) by defending these personal connections rather than group interests. As a result of this introversion, perceptions of ‘community’ and occupational identity are disorganised and become a further reason for inaction. Practitioners resolve the conflict between self-interested pursuit of fulfilment and the altruistic goals of conservation by negotiating an unspoken bargain with DOC’s authority structures. The ‘pay-offs’ for deferral to managerial authority win the space to pursue fulfilment through immersion and conspicuous achievement in work, obviating the need for more concerted defensive action. Accordingly, managerialism has not acted as a professionalising catalyst for this group. NB: The abstract has been revised by the author in the electronic version of this thesis, since the print edition was published.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectautonomyen
dc.subjectbeliefsen
dc.subjectcommunityen
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjecteconomic rationalismen
dc.subjectfront-line practitioneren
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectmanagerialismen
dc.subjectoccupationen
dc.subjectvaluesen
dc.subjectprofessionalisationen
dc.subjectvocationen
dc.subjectDepartment of Conservation (DOC)en
dc.titleManagerialism as a professionalising catalyst for the front-line practitioner community of New Zealand's Department of Conservationen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370109 Environmental Sociologyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::220000 Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts-Generalen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record