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dc.contributor.authorNori, Hollena
dc.contributor.authorMoot, Derrick J.
dc.contributor.authorMills, Annamaria
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T22:48:02Z
dc.date.available2018-07-01en
dc.date.issued2018-07-01
dc.date.submitted2018-06-11en
dc.identifier.issn0028-8233en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10394
dc.description.abstractSeed production of four annual clover species, arrowleaf (Trifolium vesiculosum), balansa (Trifolium michelianum), gland (Trifolium glanduliferum) and Persian (Trifolium resupinatum) was quantified from four sowing dates in 2010. Following initial sowing rate at 4–6 kg/ha, these clovers produced seed yields up to ∼2340 kg/ha for balansa and gland, 914 kg/ha for arrowleaf and ∼814 kg/ha for Persian. After herbage was removed the clover seedlings that regenerated produced a maximum ground cover of 91% for balansa, 65% for gland, 17% for Persian and 6% for arrowleaf. The seeds of ‘Mihi’ Persian clover were all soft and none were recovered in the soil after three months of burial. In contrast, arrowleaf clover had the highest percentage of hardseededness (>97%) and therefore retained most of its viable seeds in the soil into the second year. The differences in hardseededness and regeneration potential mean different management strategies for their successful establishment into dryland farming systems.en
dc.format.extent16en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis on behalf of the Royal Society of New Zealand
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Taylor & Francis on behalf of the Royal Society of New Zealand - https://doi.org/10.1080/00288233.2018.1488747en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/00288233.2018.1488747en
dc.rights© 2018 The Royal Society of New Zealand
dc.subjectburied seedsen
dc.subjectgerminationen
dc.subjectseed banken
dc.subjectseedling recruitmenten
dc.subjectseed softeningen
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.titleSeed production, seedling regeneration and hardseeds breakdown of annual cloversen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00288233.2018.1488747en
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Agricultural Researchen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen
dc.identifier.eissn1175-8775en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9194-4597
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5691-4915


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