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dc.contributor.authorNunez-Solis, Maria
dc.contributor.authorRatna, Nazmun N.
dc.contributor.authorRosin, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-25T00:50:57Z
dc.date.created2018-11-11en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10776
dc.description.abstractBy allowing producer households in Costa Rica to process their coffee and sell directly to specialty markets, micro-mills create opportunities to enhance the empowerment of women and sustainability of coffee production. The coffee commodity chain is commonly characterised as one that perpetuates low incomes for family producers and significant profits for retailers and commercial roasters around the world. As a commodity, coffee is associated with intensive productions systems, producer specialization in primary production and the relegation of women to traditional household roles. Responding to consistently low prices under this model, Tarrazu coffee households have embraced the innovation of family owned micro-mills and are learning to exploit direct producer-buyer relations. In this paper, we evaluate the dynamics of the Costa Rican coffee sector by analysing the experiences of micro-mill households from the perspective of the diverse economies framework. This framework recognizes the value of non-market and non-financial social relations in addition to more traditional market returns, improves understanding of the diversity of economic and environmental practices that coffee households use and contributes to the emerging literature on gender-agriculture-sustainably nexus. Using a mixed method approach, we conducted surveys and interviews with women from micro-mill households. Our results – informed by the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index – showed that women involved in micro-mills are more empowered in terms of decision making over assets and income. Likewise, it identified their leadership capabilities at the processing and value-adding stages of the coffee value-chain. Interestingly, women continue to promote sustainable farming practices despite the abandonment of certification programs with the shift to specialty markets. Our analysis of the social dynamics of micro-mills raises questions regarding the potential for individualised market actions to engender the empowerment of women and continued environmental benefits. Likewise, applying the diverse economies approach in the context of specialty coffee production affirms the contribution of women’s economic strategies and non-paid activities to the household and family enterprise. Micro-mills represent an innovative example of how coffee producers are contributing to the Sustainable Development Goal 2 to double small-scale producers’ income, promote women’s participation and family farming access to knowledge to engage with high value-added markets.en
dc.format.extent16en
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourceSustainability and Development Conferenceen
dc.subjectTarrazu-Coffeeen
dc.subjectCosta Ricaen
dc.subjectsustainable agricultureen
dc.subjectgender empowermenten
dc.subjectmicro-millsen
dc.titleCan family own enterprises contribute to women empowerment? Evidence from coffee micro-mills from Costa Rica’s Los Santos region, Tarrazu coffeeen
dc.typeConference Contribution - unpublished
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Global Value Chains and Trade
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Society
pubs.finish-date2018-11-11en
pubs.notesProgramme downloaded from https://umsustdev.org/2018-conference/ Abstract also available online, with slightly different title "Micro- mills for sustainable production and women empowerment: Evidence from Costa Rica’s Tarrazu region" (same title as on programme)en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/GVCT
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusUnpublisheden
pubs.start-date2018-11-09en
dc.publisher.placeAnn Arbor, Michigan, USAen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7565-2834
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6607-9637
lu.subtypeConference Oral Presentationen


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