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dc.contributor.authorGreig, Bruce J.
dc.contributor.authorNuthall, P.
dc.contributor.authorOld, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T23:36:59Z
dc.date.available2019-08-26en
dc.date.issued2019-08-26
dc.identifier.issn1059-924Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10925
dc.description.abstractBackground: Past research has shown farmer anxiety and stress have significantly affected many farmers and their families due not only to the impact on feelings of happiness and success, but also on output efficiency, accident rates, and health. The past approach to ameliorating anxiety has been through utilizing coping mechanisms such as sharing with significant others, venting, planning, self-blame, and positive thinking. A problem has also been farmers’ reluctance to voice difficulties and seek help. Method: An alternative, more basic approach to anxiety amelioration is possible. This involves isolating the human characteristics that lead to anxiety, and subsequently modifying these to reduce anxiety and its associated impacts. Accordingly, the extensive literature on anxiety and stress was reviewed to facilitate developing an hypothesis outlining the important components explaining farmer anxiety. To assess the parameters of farmer anxiety, a random survey of New Zealand farmers was used to obtain their ratings on their anxiety. Regression models were used to quantify the relationships. Results: Specific farmer personal characteristics were shown to be highly related to anxiety. These included a farmer’s personality, objective set, belief in their ability to control outcomes, as well as education and age. Conclusion: This analysis provides the information required to direct counseling efforts to modify the anxiety creating personal variables and, consequently, reduce anxiety and its impact on a longer term basis.en
dc.format.extent12en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Taylor & Francis - https://doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2019.1656692en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2019.1656692en
dc.rights© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectanxiety creating variablesen
dc.subjectanxiety impactsen
dc.subjectcoping mechanismsen
dc.subjectfarmer anxietyen
dc.subjectquantifying anxietyen
dc.subjectreducing anxietyen
dc.subjectEnvironmental & Occupational Healthen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshAnxietyen
dc.subject.meshPersonalityen
dc.subject.meshAgricultureen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNew Zealanden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.subject.meshFarmersen
dc.subject.meshOccupational Stressen
dc.titleAn analysis of farmers’ human characteristics as drivers of their anxietyen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Land Management and Systems
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1059924X.2019.1656692en
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Agromedicineen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/LAMS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.eissn1545-0813en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4744-6694
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4190-2679


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