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dc.contributor.authorOng, K. H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-18T00:56:55Z
dc.date.available2019-09-18T00:56:55Z
dc.date.issued1974
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/10962
dc.description.abstractThe wide occurrence of resistance to insecticides in many pest species is a prime example of rapid evolution or what is termed microevolution in the Darwinian sense (Brown, 1967). This process embraces the principles of mutation, migration and selection. As a matter of survival, pest insect species have begun a passive retaliation. In resistance, the population gene pool is being dealt with. Insecticides act as powerful “sieves”, selecting out the few pre-adapted resistant individuals within the population (Plapp, 1970) and eventually concentrating these resistant mutants (Crow, 1957) that were initially low in frequency within the population. Thus the rate of acquirement, but not mere possession of resistance depends on the recessiveness or dominance of the resistant genes. Given adequate pressure to spark off this evolutionary change, nearly all insect species are capable of developing some form of tolerance to a particular insecticide (Georghiou, 1972).en
dc.format.extentiv, 57 pagesen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterbury
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectmitesen
dc.subjectinsecticideen
dc.subjectresistance managementen
dc.subjectTetranychus urticaeen
dc.subjectreversion of insecticide resistanceen
dc.titleAn investigation into the possibility of reversion towards susceptibility in a N.Z. insecticidal strain of Tetranychus urticae Koch: a dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Horticultural Science with Honours in the University of Canterbury [Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelOtheren
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Horticultural Science with Honoursen
lu.thesis.supervisorHarrison, R. A.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservation
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc0706 Horticultural Productionen
dc.subject.anzsrc070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)en


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