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dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Zachary
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Richard
dc.contributor.authorCondron, Leo
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-18T22:56:23Z
dc.date.available2018-10-27
dc.date.issued2019-03-11
dc.date.submitted2018-10-22
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000459805400048&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=42fe17854fe8be72a22db98beb5d2208
dc.identifier.issn1439-0108
dc.identifier.otherHM9LH (isidoc)
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11085
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Stream sediment can control phosphorus (P) in the water column at baseflow. Two common laboratory analyses of sediment P are the equilibrium phosphate concentration at net zero sorption (EPC₀ ) and P fractionation. Good sample handling ensures representative results, but oftentimes, studies rely on air-dried or freeze-dried samples, which alters sediment biogeochemistry. How and to what extent this influences EPC₀ and P fractionation remains unclear. We therefore examine pretreatment effects on sediment EPC₀ and P fractionation. Materials and methods: We collected fine sediments (< 2 mm) from streams in the Tukituki River and Reporoa Basins in New Zealand (n = 31 sediments). Subsamples were then either kept fresh, frozen then lyophilized (freeze-dried), or dried at 40 °C for 2 weeks (air-dried). Measurements of EPC₀ and P fractionation were made in triplicate. The sequential P fractionation scheme determined five different P pools: NH₄ Cl (labile P), NaOH reactive P (RP; metal oxide-bound P) and unreactive P (URP; organic P), HCl (Ca-mineral P), and residual P. Along with statistical comparisons between fresh results and the two pre-treatments, we explored correlations between pre-treatment effects and sediment physicochemical characteristics. Results and discussion: The sediments had generally low EPC₀ (majority < 0.020 mg P L⁻¹), and uncertainty in EPC₀ increased with concentration magnitude. While there were sediment-specific changes in EPC₀ with pre-treatment, there was no consistent bias caused by pre-treatment. However, the differences between the fresh and air-dried sediment EPC₀ were larger and more variable than between fresh and freeze-dried sediment. For P fractionation, the Tukituki sediments were enriched in HCl-P, while Reporoa sediments had more NaOH-RP and NaOH-URP. Despite large sediment-specific changes, the overall effects of freeze- and air-drying sediment were increased NH₄ Cl-P (estimated average effect, θ̂ = + 0.63 and + 3.7 mg P kg⁻¹ ), no significant changes for NaOH-RP, contrasting changes in NaOH-URP (− 3.4 and + 3.3 mg P kg⁻¹ ), and decreased HCl-P (− 40 and − 33 mg P kg −1 ). Conclusions: We found that drying sediment significantly influenced EPC₀ and P fractions (especially the NH₄Cl-P fraction). Air-drying was particularly error-prone and should be avoided. The use of freeze-drying to preserve samples for later analyses and improve ease of handling may be used with appropriate consideration of the research objectives and the error introduced by freeze-drying. However, we recommend using fresh sediments for analyses whenever possible, as they best represent natural conditions.
dc.format.extentpp.1587-1597
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.relationThe original publication is available from Springer - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-018-2180-3
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-018-2180-3
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018
dc.subjectfractionation
dc.subjectphosphorus
dc.subjectSediment
dc.subjectSorption
dc.titleThe error in stream sediment phosphorus fractionation and sorption properties effected by drying pretreatments
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11368-018-2180-3
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Soils and Sediments
pubs.issue3
pubs.organisational-group|LU
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences|SOILS
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office|QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.volume19
dc.identifier.eissn1614-7480
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3911-4825
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3082-994X


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