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dc.contributor.authorJoo, Tay Hock
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T03:56:37Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T03:56:37Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11234
dc.description.abstractA hydraulic ram may be described as a simple, noisy, self-operating/automatic and efficient water raising machine. It is also a unique and interesting pumping device which combines the quality of prime-mover and pump. The assembly of the different components of a hydraulic ram is shown in Figure 1. A hydraulic ram utilises the water power, derived from the fall of a substantial volume of water down a low height, to raise a relatively small portion of the water to a great height. Therefore, it needs no external energy sources like fossil fuels, solar and wind energies. Instead, the requirements for operating a ram include (a) enough water supply to run the ram and (b) enough height of the water supply. Small amount of water that falls from a great height works equally well as large volume flowing down from a low height. But, the latter situation is more commonly encountered. At the delivery end, the greater the height the water is to be pumped, the less is the flow of water, which are dependence upon the supply height and supply flow. The source of water supply may come from a spring, a natural water-fall or a river with necessary construction to raise the water level relative to the ram. Usually, a supply/feed tank is built to store up the water before it runs through the ram. A hydraulic ram is the most durable pumping machine which incurs virtually no running costs and needs little maintenance. There are only two moving parts: waste valve and delivery valve. Even so, lubrication is not essential because water acts as a natural lubricant. The maintenance of a ram only includes: (a) replacement of the rubber valves if they wear out, (b) adjusting the 'tuning' of the waste valve. Occasionally, the ram is dismantled for cleaning. It is important to prevent the debris, leaves and branches from entering the ram by using strainer at the intake of water.en
dc.format.extent37 pagesen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterbury
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjecthydraulic ramen
dc.subjectSarawaken
dc.subjectwater pumpen
dc.subjectdeveloping countriesen
dc.titleThe development of hydraulic ram for village use in developing countries : a dissertation submitted for the degree of Diploma in Natural Resources, Lincoln College and University of Canterburyen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Natural Resourcesen
lu.thesis.supervisorPainter, D.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Management
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc0502 Environmental Science and Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc0907 Environmental Engineeringen


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