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dc.contributor.authorHeath, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-17T02:41:04Z
dc.date.available2009-07-17T02:41:04Z
dc.date.issued1978
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1129
dc.description.abstractThe design of any man-made structure in the rural landscape involves making a conscious design decision as to its surface colour. In the past, structures such as houses, farm buildings and bridges often assimilated the colour of the surrounding landscape because they were built from local materials. Even materials which were not indigenous to the area have subsequently weathered and have established an empathy with the landscape. On the other hand, modern structures rarely reflect local eccentricities. Mass produced components and prefabricated structures appear to display only a common utilitarianism which is evident throughout the nationally distributed market. In addition, changes in methods of farming combined with a growth in technology as applied to the agricultural and building industries has made it possible and necessary to erect larger scale buildings in the rural landscape than has been traditional. Such buildings, being more industrial in scale than rural, present visual problems, particularly as the majority have been constructed at minimum capital cost. This study accepts the inevitability of these changes. Structures are needed at a cost which can be afforded. Building flexibility is required to accommodate specialised skills which will change due to improved techniques. But since the rural environment has become increasingly a place of visual and recreational enjoyment for most New Zealanders, it is important to investigate means whereby the visual impact of these man-made structures is minimised, or alternatively, whereby the impact can be used to enhance the existing rural landscape. One practical means of controlling the impact of structures in the rural landscape appears to be by an effective use of surface colour. It has become apparent however, that there is little information available concerning the choice of surface colours on structures. That deficiency led to this study. Any study of this nature has obvious application to many different groups of people. These include farmers, designers, planners and manufacturers. Each group has its own requirement for specific technical information. This communication problem has had to be resolved in the presentation of the study. Therefore, it was decided to divide the material produced into three parts, each having a predominant significance for a major user group. Part 1 : "Colour for Structures in the Landscape : Colours of the New Zealand rural landscape." Colours were derived from the rural landscape. A limited range of the predominant colours throughout rural New Zealand were then weighted for seasonal vegetation changes and the likely occurrence of buildings etc. Only in this general way, could a useful range of compatible colours be produced for the national manufacturing market. Part 2 : "Colour for Structures in the Landscape: A design guide to the use of colour in the New Zealand rural landscape". This part gives emphasis to colour use by the lay-user. It describes fundamental principles for an effective use of colour particularly on buildings. It also makes the important distinction between 'accent' and 'compatible' colours and their uses in different situations. Part 3 : "Colour for Structures in the landscape: A methodology for colour derivation in the New Zealand rural landscape." This part describes for designers and planners, the way in which colours were selected and collated in this study. It therefore suggests a framework within which specific area and project studies can be conducted. It will be seen that no one part is fully independent of the others. For example, a colour may be selected from the general manufacturers' range specified in Part 1 because it is appropriate to a specific site. But the manner in which that colour is used is subject to the broad principles of colour use outlined in Part 2. Further, where a structure has, or is likely to have a reasonable visual impact, it is recommended that an independent colour analysis is made for that specific landscape. The methodology for such an analysis is described in Part 3. As a final introductory comment to the total study it should be stressed that the findings give only a general guidance as to the range of colours existing in the rural landscape of New Zealand. There is no one general colour range which will cover every specific landscape type. On the other hand, the range offered will minimize many of the existing and potential intrusions in the countryside.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.subjectcolouren
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.subjectrural landscapeen
dc.subjectstructuresen
dc.subjectdesign methodologyen
dc.subjectcolour derivationen
dc.titleColour for structures in the landscapeen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::310000 Architecture, Urban Environment and Buildingen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::310000 Architecture, Urban Environment and Building::310200 Buildingen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370109 Environmental Sociologyen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen


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