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dc.contributor.authorNicol, Ellen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-23T23:22:57Z
dc.date.available2020-02-23T23:22:57Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11450
dc.description.abstractThe Shift Foundation delivers programmes aiming to improve the wellbeing of young women aged 12-20 in the Wellington region. This research focuses on the Just Shift It programme which uses physical activity and movement to positively impact wellbeing. This research aimed to evaluate the associations between physical activity levels (vigorous, moderate, sitting, walking and total MET minutes) and psychological wellbeing (autonomy, personal growth, environmental mastery, life purpose, self-acceptance and positive relations with others) and to understand the lived experiences of 15 to 17-year-old female participants as it pertains to their participation in the Shift Foundation’s Just Shift It programme. A mixed method approach was used comprising of 249 surveys and nine interviews, allowing for further exploration of trends which were first highlighted with the quantitative method. Interviews with the participants and the programme coordinators were used to provide more insight into the themes highlighted in the surveys, and to also understand the overall impact of physical activity on the young women’s wellbeing. Moreover, the survey and interview information were used to determine associations between six aspects of wellbeing and various physical activity levels. The results showed that there were negative correlations in the 15-year-old age group between some physical activity and wellbeing variables, no correlations in the 16-year-old age group, and positive correlations between the 17-year-old age group. The interview data showed the importance of educating young women about wellbeing in a way that they can understand, and providing them with positive physical activity experiences in order to encourage continued engagement throughout adolescence. In order to create a successful youth development programme which provides these positive experiences, the key elements of programme design highlighted were relationship building within the group, creating a ‘safe’ space for the young women, and adopting a co-design approach to meet the needs of the young women and ensure their engagement.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectwellbeingen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectco-designen
dc.subjectrelationship buildingen
dc.subjectWhanaungatangaen
dc.subjectHauoraen
dc.subjectpositive experienceen
dc.subjectpsychological wellbeing scaleen
dc.subjectInternational Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)en
dc.subjectyoung womenen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleShifting the wellbeing of females: the lived experiences of young women in New Zealand : A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Applied Science at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorKerr, Roslyn
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
dc.subject.anzsrc16 Studies in Human Societyen
dc.subject.anzsrc17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc13 Educationen
dc.subject.anzsrc170113 Social and Community Psychologyen


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