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dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Rosalinden
dc.contributor.authorPletnyakov, P.en
dc.contributor.authorNoble, A.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T03:40:28Z
dc.date.available2020-01-30en
dc.date.issued2020-01en
dc.identifier.issn2296-665Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/11555
dc.description.abstractThe build-up of soil phosphorus (P) beyond plant requirements can lead to a long-term legacy of P losses that could impair surface water quality. Using a database of ∼4,50,000 samples collected from 2001–2015 we report the level of soil P enrichment by soil type, land use and region and the time it would take for Olsen P to decline to agronomic targets (20–0 mg L⁻¹) if P fertilizer was stopped. We also modeled the time it would take for water extractable P (WEP), an indicator of P losses in surface runoff, to decline to an environmental target (0.02 mg L⁻¹). Some 63% of the samples were enriched beyond agronomic targets. The area-weighted median time to reach the agronomic target was predicted to occur within a year for 75% of samples but varied up to 11.8 years in some land uses. However, the area-weighted time to reach an environmental target was 26–55 years for the 50th and 75th percentile of areas. This indicates that while an agronomic target can be easily met, additional strategies other than stopping P fertilizer inputs are required to meet an environmental target.en
dc.format.extent12en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Frontiers Media SA - https://doi.org/10.3389/fenvs.2020.00006en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fenvs.2020.00006en
dc.rights© 2020 McDowell, Dodd, Pletnyakov and Noble.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectOlsen phosphorusen
dc.subjectsoil test phosphorusen
dc.subjectsurface runoffen
dc.subjectwater extractable phosphorusen
dc.subjectleachingen
dc.titleThe ability to reduce soil legacy phosphorus at a country scaleen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fenvs.2020.00006en
dc.subject.anzsrc050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)en
dc.subject.anzsrc050302 Land Capability and Soil Degradationen
dc.subject.anzsrc079902 Fertilisers and Agrochemicals (incl. Application)en
dc.subject.anzsrc0502 Environmental Science and Managementen
dc.relation.isPartOfFrontiers in Environmental Scienceen
pubs.notesArticle number: 6 Date of acceptance: 09 Jan 2020en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen
pubs.volume8en
dc.identifier.eissn2296-665Xen
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-8970-2460
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3911-4825


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