Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTahana, N.en
dc.contributor.authorGrant, K. T. O. K.en
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, David G.en
dc.contributor.authorFairweather, John R.en
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-20T02:03:58Z
dc.date.issued2000-02en
dc.identifier.issn1174-670Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/119
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to develop an understanding of tourism and Maori development in Rotorua. The research process followed recognised protocols typical of culturally appropriate research and was sensitive to the historic context of Te Arawa in Rotorua. The research was based on three main sources of data: surveys of Maori tourism operators and Maori in the community, focus group discussion with Maori in the community, and interviews with hapu (sub-tribe) representatives. An historical account of the development of Maori in tourism provided context for the contemporary situation. Current Maori tourism operators cover a wide range of tourism businesses, most market themselves as Maori tourism businesses and the majority have been in operation less than 11 years. Most have relatively low financial turnover and nearly all feature some aspect of Maori culture in their tourism business. Maori respondents reported both good and bad effects from tourism, with some seeing tourism as promoting their culture and self-determination, and others seeing it as disempowering. There was similar ambivalence regarding Maori adaptation to tourism, however most respondents considered that Maori had adapted well to cultural performances and guiding. Generally, most respondents believed that the presentation of Maori culture has changed over time to cater for tourism demands but not in ways that significantly affects the practice of Maori culture. Maori respondents were divided in their opinion about the effect of tourism on their relationship with the environment especially with respect to Wairuatanga (spirituality) and Mana Whenua (authority over the land). Some were concerned about ownership and control of natural resources and were seeking greater input into their management. The presentation of Maori culture was seen by a majority of respondents as a misrepresentation. There were concerns about relevance, consultation, control and authenticity. The report makes a number of recommendations to encourage Maori tourism business.en
dc.format.extent1-95en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Tourism Research and Education Centre.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Tourism Research and Education Centre. - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/119en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTRREC Reporten
dc.subjecttourismen
dc.subjectRotoruaen
dc.subjectMaorien
dc.titleTourism and Maori development in Rotoruaen
dc.typeMonograph
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350500 Tourismen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
dc.subject.anzsrc1506 Tourismen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/119en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4488-1877


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record