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dc.contributor.authorKanyoke, Eric L.en
dc.contributor.authorBecken, Susanneen
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline M.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-30T03:56:07Z
dc.date.issued2008-12en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1215
dc.description.abstractAs the tourism industry’s greenhouse gas emission impacts on the global environment is increasing, carbon accounting is fast becoming a vital tool for establishing the magnitude of impacts and identifying the players responsible. The unique trip characteristics of private and commercial vehicles in tourist destinations makes it difficult to assess real impact levels. This paper proposes a methodology for assessing the carbon footprint of Indirect Tourism Transport (i.e. delivery and service vehicle operations), serving the tourism industry. It described a unique data collection approach from tourism businesses and transport operators, and how this information is processed and used to assess the tourism industry’s supply chain carbon footprint. Distance and weight of load delivered to the customer are considered the variables that determine carbon footprint in this methodology. The methodology could be used to account for tourism industry’s share of total carbon footprint of commercial vehicle operations, on the basis of regional, national or international tourist destinations in order to establish the sustainability of the industry’s indirect transport. It could also act as a first generation forecasting model for assessing future carbon footprint projections, to be associated with tourism transport for tourist destination planning purposes.en
dc.format.extent44-44en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University.en
dc.sourceNew Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Research Conference 2008en
dc.subjectcarbon footprinten
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.subjecttourismen
dc.subjecttransporten
dc.titleIndirect tourism transport : a proposed carbon footprint assessmenten
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350500 Tourismen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
lu.contributor.unitResearch Management Officeen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff groupen
pubs.finish-date2008-12-05en
pubs.notesWorking paper presented at the New Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Research Conference, Hanmer Springs, 3-5 December 2008.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2008-12-03en
dc.publisher.placeLincolnen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947
lu.subtypeConference Abstracten


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