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dc.contributor.authorDobbinson, Selwyn
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-09T21:51:40Z
dc.date.available2020-08-09T21:51:40Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/12372
dc.description.abstractIt was proposed that pigs arriving dead at an abattoir, or dying soon after arrival, had suffered from heat-stress during transport by road. A pre-study report showed that the majority of pigs that had died had been penned on the bottom decks of the truck and trailer units, with the greatest number having been penned in the bottom front pen of the truck crate. Consequently, temperature and humidity within a stock-truck, that transported pigs to an abattoir from two farms, were monitored over a three year period. A video camera was mounted in the bottom front pen to establish the behaviour of the pigs that were being transported. The videos produced were then used to establish the point at which open-mouth breathing (an indicator for stress) commenced, and whether this coincided with temperature/humidity index values in the pens. As a qualitative measure of transport stress, meat quality from pigs at different locations on the stock truck were measured and compared with results from a third 'low-stress' farm. A novel fan-driven ventilation system was designed and installed, and its impact was measured after insulation had been applied to the front wall of the stock-crate. The stock-vehicle design and the ventilation systems used in international stock transport studies, were compared with stock transport vehicles in New Zealand, and potential differences in the results from international studies with the current study were discussed. Despite the differences in vehicle designs, the current study suggested that the temperature/humidity levels recorded would under-pin the onset of heat-stress, particularly during the summer months in New Zealand. Unlike many international studies, evidence of conditions that would lead to substantial cold-stress, was not found.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectpigen
dc.subjecttemperature-humidity indexen
dc.subjecttemperature stressen
dc.subjectmeat qualityen
dc.subjectcooling fansen
dc.subjectheat stressen
dc.subjectlivestock transporten
dc.titleA study of factors that lead to stress in pigs during road transport including an examination of a novel mechanical ventilation system: A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorHickford, Jonathan
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc070207 Humane Animal Treatmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc150703 Road Transportation and Freight Servicesen
dc.subject.anzsrc070203 Animal Managementen


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