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dc.contributor.authorMillar, Rachael J
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-16T21:31:47Z
dc.date.available2020-08-16T21:31:47Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/12468
dc.description.abstractThe failure of traditional environmental management methods to address complex environmental problems and policy issues has led to calls for new approaches to environmental management based on increased community participation in the decision-making process. Landcare is one such approach, and is driven by the principles of community participation and empowerment. Throughout New Zealand and Australia, groups of people are forming to respond to the challenge of specific environmental problems. These groups are known as landcare groups, and if effective, can contribute to more sound environmental management. At the same time, regional councils in New Zealand are charged with the task of promoting the integrated, sustainable management of a region's resources. Landcare can be a viewed as a tool to achieve this, however, adequate funding and support, high levels of community involvement, coordination of groups and grassroots action are necessary. In order for landcare to be an effective means of promoting sustainable management, regional councils must provide support and services to landcare groups. This may be viewed as a process of building social capital, social capital being those features of social organisation such as networks, norms any trust that increase a society's productive potential" (Putnam, 1993). By building social capital through the provision of support and services, regional councils can increase the ability of landcare groups to promote sustainable management. However, although many councils have expressed willingness to support landcare initiatives, proactive steps have only been taken by some and there is considerable variety in the levelsof support provided. This research project examines the support base provided by the Southland and Canterbury regional councils and uses a framework for building social capital to ascertain the types of support and services landcare groups require from regional councils, and to analyse the variation between regions in support bases and requirements. It was found that regionals councils have much to learn from each other and there is a need for central government to assume a more coordinative and integrative role in environmental management and in building social capital. It is recommended that central government strengthen regional government support for landcare and increase the role of the New Zealand Landcare Trust in order to achieve this.en
dc.format.extentviii, 72 pages
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandcareen
dc.subjectlandcare groupen
dc.subjectenvironmental managementen
dc.subjectcommunity participationen
dc.subjectsustainable managementen
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten
dc.subjectsocial capitalen
dc.title"Sustainable management through social capital construction" : The types of support and services landcare groups require from regional councils: A case study in Southland and Canterbury : A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Resource Studies with Honoursen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelOtheren
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Resource Studies (Honours)en
lu.thesis.supervisorMontgomery, R.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only.en
dc.subject.anzsrc05 Environmental Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc0502 Environmental Science and Managementen


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