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dc.contributor.authorSunaseweenonta, Vorajiten
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-06T21:27:24Z
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1320
dc.description.abstractThe Social Investment Fund (SIF) programme was funded by the World Bank in response to the Thai government’s attempt to alleviate poverty for people, who were affected socially and economically by the economic crisis in Thailand in mid-1997 (SOFO, n.d.; World Bank, 2001). The programme planned to use a participatory approach to increase their well-being by promoting long-term self-reliance and empowerment. People’s livelihoods are complex, diverse, and can be influenced by multiple-factors such as social structure, policies, processes, seasonality, and access and control of life sustaining capital. To successfully improve people’s livelihoods and alleviate poverty, their multiple needs have to be satisfied. The research used semi-structured interviews and focus groups to obtain research results. The research was conducted with three communities in Southern Thailand: Naa Moon Sri, Naa Kao Sia, and Baan Tae Rum to evaluate whether the SIF programme improved the livelihoods of the people in the communities and whether the people achieved the same level of assistance and support from the SIF that could lead to success of their sub-projects. Research findings and lessons learnt could be useful for future development. Major findings were that the evaluation of success is not straightforward, as different authorities defined success differently and because the sub-projects in the communities were at different stages of development. The level of the SIF’s support also affected success of the sub-projects. The SIF focused more on facilitating networks between communities and outside organisations and did not facilitate participation among people within the communities. Thus, it operated more effectively when a sub-project was established upon existing communal groups. For sub-projects, those that learn to cope with their vulnerability better can become more successful. The communities’ projects can be more successful and sustainable if their project members can equally participate throughout the overall process of their project’s development. Communication, trust, and networking among the community members themselves and between the communities and development organisations can also reduce their vulnerability and lead to success and sustainability of their projects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectsustainable livelihoodsen
dc.subjectnetworkingen
dc.subjectSocial Investment Fund (SIF)en
dc.subjectempowermenten
dc.subjectmultiple needsen
dc.subjectvulnerabilityen
dc.subjectcommunity developmenten
dc.subjectpovertyen
dc.titleSocial Investment Fund : case studies of sub-projects in southern Thailanden
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370100 Sociology::370108 Rural Sociologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitApplied Management and Computingen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/AMAC
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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