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dc.contributor.authorKappelle, Robert J.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-06T23:22:51Z
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1322
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of relationships between local populations and nearby protected natural areas is necessitated by recent shifts towards socially inclusive park management. This study uses a qualitative case-study approach to explore the relationships between a local community and public conservation lands in Arthur's Pass and the Waimakariri Basin, New Zealand. Interviews undertaken with local residents, tourism operators, farmers, conservation management staff and bach owners indicate that relationships between the local population and conservation activity around them occur within a complex milieu - a harsh yet rewarding physical environment, a history of conflicting attitudes towards the land, a changing conservation management style and the intricacies of a small, isolated, rural community in the 21st century. In order to understand the local people-park relationship, three dimensions are proposed: lifestyle, attachment and recreation; tourism; and interactions with Department of Conservation (DOC) staff. The large areas of conservation land in and around Arthur's Pass and the Waimakariri Basin are a central influence on the lives of local people. They attract a population who appreciates the scenic, bio-physical, productive, spiritual and recreational values of the surrounding environment. Most people have made a deliberate choice to live in the area, rather than following work opportunities elsewhere. Historical attachment to the land is significant, particularly for farmers and bach owners. Low-key forms of tourism in the area, based on the conservation lands, are consistent with the lifestyle aspirations of many in the local community. Conflict between locals and tourists is minimal. The relationship between DOC and the community appears to hinge on four factors: residents' attachment to the conservation land; public ownership of the conservation lands; the high visibility of conservation staff in the community; and the shift towards corporate style conservation management. Farmers' relationships with DOC are coloured by historical grievances centring on private-public sector debates and the perception that public land managers are predisposed to placing protection on grazing land. Locals attribute poor communication from DOC as one reason for the less than optimal relationship between conservation managers and the community. A model depicting central aspects of the local people-park relationship is presented and discussed. Implications of the findings for future research on local people-park relationships and socially inclusive park management are examined.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectcommunityen
dc.subjectdestination developmenten
dc.subjectpublic agency-community relationsen
dc.subjectpark-neighbour relationsen
dc.subjectArthur's Passen
dc.subjectWaimakariri Basinen
dc.subjectconservation landsen
dc.subjectlocal perceptionsen
dc.subjectsocially inclusive park managementen
dc.subjectplace attachmenten
dc.subjectrecreational place attachmenten
dc.subjectbenefits of recreationen
dc.subjectleisure participation theoryen
dc.subjectenvironmental valuesen
dc.subjectprotected natural area tourismen
dc.subjectDepartment of Conservation (DOC)en
dc.titleRelationships between local people and protected natural areas : a case study of Arthur’s Pass and the Waimakariri Basin, New Zealanden
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Managementen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300900 Land, Parks and Agriculture Management::300902 Land and parks managementen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350500 Tourismen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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