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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Masood
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-07T23:12:23Z
dc.date.available2009-12-07T23:12:23Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1329
dc.descriptionSubmitted for Ph.D. but awarded Master of Agricultural Science.en
dc.description.abstractBetween 1977 and 1980, a series of pot and field experiments were conducted to investigate the life history, seed survival rate and competitive ability of fathen against lucerne and peas. The life cycle of fathen is not bounded by specific temperature or photoperiod requirements. Under Lincoln conditions, it can behave as a spring, summer or even autumn annual, showing various kinds of plant structure and seed production, depending on the time of emergence. The polymorphic seeds of fathen influence its life cycle. Brown-smooth seeds have fast emergence rates and the plants grown from them are superior to plants grown from black-smooth seeds. Fathen is tolerant to both drought and water-logging, shows much pasticity under different densities, partitions a considerable proportion of its total weight into seeds with very large numbers being produced, and has an indeterminate growth habit. Fathen seed has a high emergence rate from the soil surface, but from below 40 mm depth there is little emergence. The seeds that do not germinate immediately, due to dormancy or greater burial depth, remain viable in the soil for at least 30 to 40, or even 46 years in soil (Chapter 1) and loss of viability takes place gradually. Thus, growing lucerne continuously for a long period of time would be an effective way of reducing number of viable fathen seeds. Fathen is competitive with lucerne, and when not controlled, can cause both lucerne mortality and dry matter reduction to the level of virtual extinction. By giving a topping treatment, however, both lucerne establishment and its dry matter can be increased. By regulating the date of planting (for example, sowing lucerne in August), infestation of fathen can be greatly reduced. Cutting or topping is also effective in reducing fathen but, due to the uneven emergence of fathen, it is difficult to recommend a specific cutting or topping time. High densities of peas of 92 plants m⁻² suppress fathen and MCPB is an effective chamical against fathen in pea crops. The results are discussed in relation to climate, growing conditions and cultivation practices.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectfathenen
dc.subjectChenopodium album L.en
dc.subjectweed controlen
dc.subjectcrops and climateen
dc.subjectfathen-lucerne competitionen
dc.subjectfathen-pea competitionen
dc.subjectseed productionen
dc.subjectagricultural ecologyen
dc.subjectnitrophyteen
dc.subjectseed viabilityen
dc.titleAutecology and survival of fathen (Chenopodium album L.)en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300200 Crop and Pasture Production::300204 Plant protection (pests, diseases and weeds)en
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300200 Crop and Pasture Productionen
lu.thesis.supervisorLanger, R. H. M.
lu.thesis.supervisorWhite, J. G. H.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en


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