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dc.contributor.authorNeumann, Mona
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-11T06:37:11Z
dc.date.available2021-03-11T06:37:11Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/13568
dc.description.abstractCities are facing complex, interdependent sustainability challenges that require a deep systemic transformation. In view of an apparent inability of the current urban planning system to bring about change fast enough, this dissertation explores the opportunity for urban planning to incorporate a transition management approach. Transition management, derived from the sustainability transitions research field, is a prescriptive, complexity-based governance framework that aims to create space outside of convention planning processes to enable the social production of solutions that break with the status quo (Nevens et al., 2013). The dissertation takes the Te Ara Mua – Future Streets project in Auckland as a case study to investigate the main similarities and differences of planning approaches in practice compared to transition management. The analysis is conceptualised on the basis of a process-oriented analytical framework which follows the guidance manual for transition management in the urban context (Roorda et al., 2014). The study identified four conflict lines that, for one, confirm previous research on this topic, and add an additional aspect to Peris and Bosch’s fields of tension (Peris & Bosch, 2020). The research illustrates the limitations for urban planning to incorporate a transition management approach, while also highlighting the potential to transform existing urban planning practices to enable system innovation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecttransition managementen
dc.subjecturban sustainability transitionsen
dc.subjecturban planningen
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten
dc.subjectfuture streetsen
dc.titleTransition Management – the key to accelerating the decarbonisation of New Zealand’s transport system? : A Dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Planning at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Planningen
lu.thesis.supervisorPage, Shannon
lu.thesis.supervisorVallance, Suzanne
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc070108 Sustainable Agricultural Developmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc120599 Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classifieden


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