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dc.contributor.authorChetsumon, Sireeraten
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-03T21:42:50Z
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/1371
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested 'expert systems' might have a significant role in the future through enabling many more people to access human experts. It is, therefore, important to understand how potential users interact with these computer systems. This study investigates the effect of extension agents' attitudes towards the features and use of an example expert system for rice disease diagnosis and management(POSOP). It also considers the effect of extension agents' personality traits and intelligence on their attitudes towards its use, and the agents' perception of control over using it. Answers to these questions lead to developing better systems and to increasing their adoption. Using structural equation modelling, two models - the extension agents' perceived usefulness of POSOP, and their attitude towards the use of POSOP, were developed (Models ATU and ATP). Two of POSOP's features (its value as a decision support tool, and its user interface), two personality traits (Openness (0) and Extraversion (E)), and the agents' intelligence, proved to be significant, and were evaluated. The agents' attitude towards POSOP's value had a substantial impact on their perceived usefulness and their attitude towards using it, and thus their intention to use POSOP. Their attitude towards POSOP's user interface also had an impact on their attitude towards its perceived usefulness, but had no impact on their attitude towards using it. However, the user interface did contribute to its value. In Model ATU, neither Openness (0) nor Extraversion (E) had an impact on the agents' perceived usefulness indicating POSOP was considered useful regardless of the agents' personality background. However, Extraversion (E) had a negative impact on their intention to use POSOP in Model ATP indicating that 'introverted' agents had a clear intention to use POSOP relative to the 'extroverted' agents. Extension agents' intelligence, in terms of their GPA, had neither an impact on their attitude, nor their subjective norm (expectation of 'others' beliefs), to the use of POSOP. It also had no association with any of the variables in both models. Both models explain and predict that it is likely that the agents will use POSOP. However, the availability of computers, particularly their capacity, are likely to impede its use. Although the agents believed using POSOP would not be difficult, they still believed training would be beneficial. To be a useful decision support tool, the expert system's value and user interface as well as its usefulness and ease of use, are all crucially important to the preliminary acceptance of a system. Most importantly, the users' problems and needs should be assessed and taken into account as a first priority in developing an expert system. Furthermore, the users should be involved in the system development. The results emphasise that the use of an expert system is not only determined by the system's value and its user interface, but also the agents' perceived usefulness, and their attitude towards using it. In addition, the agents' perception of control over using it is also a significant factor. The results suggested improvements to the system's value and its user interface would increase its potential use, and also providing suitable computers, coupled with training, would encourage its use.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectdecision support systemen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectattitudesen
dc.subjectextensionen
dc.subjectexpert systemsen
dc.subjectknowledge-based systemsen
dc.subjectpersonality traitsen
dc.subjectextraversionen
dc.subjectintelligenceen
dc.subjectThailanden
dc.subjectopennessen
dc.titleAttitudes of extension agents towards expert systems as decision support tools in Thailanden
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::280000 Information, Computing and Communication Sciencesen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::280000 Information, Computing and Communication Sciences::280300 Computer Softwareen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::380000 Behavioural and Cognitive Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitApplied Management and Computingen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/AMAC
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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