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dc.contributor.authorMeister, A.
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez-Ginés, Maria Jesus
dc.contributor.authorMaxfield, A.
dc.contributor.authorGaw, S.
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorHorswell, J.
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Brett
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-11T22:02:02Z
dc.date.available2021-07-20en
dc.date.issued2021-07
dc.date.submitted2021-07-13en
dc.identifier.issn2304-8158en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/14119
dc.description.abstractSoil properties in the foraging range of honeybees influence honey composition. We aimed to determine relationships between the antimicrobial properties of New Zealand mānuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey and elemental concentrations in the honey, plants, and soils. We analyzed soils, plants, and fresh mānuka honey samples from the Wairarapa region of New Zealand for the chemical elements and the antimicrobial activity of the honey as indicated by methylglyoxal (MGO) and dihydroxyacetone (DHA). There were significant negative correlations between honey MGO and the concentrations of Mn, Cu, Mg, S, Na, Ba, K, Zn, and Al. These elements may provide a low-cost means of assessing mānuka honey quality. For individual elements, except for K, there were no correlations between the honeys, plants, and soils. Soil nitrate concentrations were negatively correlated with concentrations of MGO and DHA in the honey, which implies that soil fertility may be a determiner of mānuka honey quality.en
dc.format.extent11en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - MDPI - https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071670en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071670en
dc.rights© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectdihydroxyacetoneen
dc.subjectmānuka honeyen
dc.subjectmethylglyoxalen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectnon-peroxide antimicrobial activityen
dc.titleChemical elements and the quality of mānuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honeyen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservation
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/foods10071670en
dc.relation.isPartOfFoodsen
pubs.issue7en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.volume10en
dc.identifier.eissn2304-8158en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7862-3142
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0322-0255
pubs.article-number1670en
dc.subject.anzsrc2020300602 Food chemistry and food sensory scienceen
dc.subject.anzsrc2020410604 Soil chemistry and soil carbon sequestration (excl. carbon sequestration science)en
dc.subject.anzsrc2020310703 Microbial ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc2020300603 Food nutritional balanceen


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