Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMansergh, David Graham
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-30T22:29:15Z
dc.date.available2021-08-30T22:29:15Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/14172
dc.description.abstractContract implementation problems are common within the New Zealand landscape industry. Often a designer will arrive on site to find that the working documents have not been followed in the way intended, resulting in either incorrect placement of elements, poor quality or a mixture of the two. This can cause contractual disputes and delay project completion. The principles of Relevance Theory (Sperber and Wilson 1986) are applied to the landscape industry to explain contract communication, its success and its failure. Relevance theory makes predictions about modes of communication, mutual assumptions and the context of communication which explain how designers and contractors interpret information presented to them. Based on a series of depth interviews, some contract problems are shown to be caused by misunderstanding or misinterpretation of plans and specifications. Projects involving a designer and contractor who do not hold mutual assumptions about the work involved and quality required are less likely to be accomplished satisfactorily. Projects where strong mutual assumptions exist between designer and contractor are more likely to be successful. Terminology can be interpreted in different ways. On-site communication and inspection is important in helping to develop mutual assumptions. Verbal and non-verbal communication is examined. Successful contract communication is shown to make use of many forms of communication.en
dc.format.extentvii, 120 pages
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.subjectlandscape designen
dc.subjectpractice communicationen
dc.subjectcontract communicationen
dc.subjectprofessional practiceen
dc.subjectrelevance theoryen
dc.titleContract communication in the landscape industry and its effect on quality : A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorGelfand, L
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc2020330109 Landscape architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc2020350713 Project managementen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail
Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record