Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Michael R.en
dc.contributor.authorBlackburne, K.en
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, C.en
dc.contributor.authorLee, W.en
dc.contributor.authorPickett, T.en
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-14T21:22:25Z
dc.date.available2018-06-01en
dc.date.issued2018-06-01en
dc.identifier.issn2043-068Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/14388
dc.description.abstractThis article presents ways to rethink current approaches to protected areas in New Zealand, which have been dominated by problematic colonial ideas that uniformly construct such places as separate from people and as reminiscent of a pre-human past. This has resulted in the strict separation of productive landscapes from protected landscapes in Aotearoa, New Zealand. A re-evaluation of the idea of allocating further lands that have high endemic biodiversity values solely for protection is considered in light of the country’s public conservation lands reaching 33 per cent of the country’s total land area and still continuing to grow. Using a design-directed research approach we put forward seven alternatives to imagining protected areas that act as speculative futures from which to reimagine and expand the potential of New Zealand’s indigenous biodiversity beyond solely preservation-focused approaches that have been based on a fortress conservation model. These futures are not prescriptive but opportunities to extend the value that New Zealand’s indigenous biodiversity might have, and consider its capacity to foster deep connections between people and place, in ways in which both endemic biodiversity and people thrive.en
dc.format.extent72-93en
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntellecten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Intellect - https://doi.org/10.1386/des.7.1.72_1 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/des/2018/00000007/00000001/art00005;jsessionid=6bbsb6kbgdoj2.x-ic-live-03en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1386/des.7.1.72_1en
dc.rights© 2018 Intellect Ltd Article.en
dc.subjectbiodiversityen
dc.subjectconservation valuesen
dc.subjectdesign-directed researchen
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.subjectprotected areasen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleA new wild: Reimagining the potential of indigenous biodiversity in Aotearoa, New Zealanden
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.identifier.doi10.1386/des.7.1.72_1en
dc.relation.isPartOfDesign Ecologiesen
pubs.issue1en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/SOLA
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/intellect/des/2018/00000007/00000001/art00005;jsessionid=6bbsb6kbgdoj2.x-ic-live-03en
pubs.volume7en


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record